Knock sensor location

Tiny
MADDOG77
  • 2003 TOYOTA CAMRY
  • 140,000 MILES

I just ran a OBDII scan on my car. It is the LE model four cylinder 2.4 liter engine, automatic transmission in which it gave me a P0325 code. I know this has to do with the knock sensor. My question is, where is it located on this vehicle and what do I have to do to get to it in order to replace it?

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 7:55 PM

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Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
  • 49,757 POSTS

Note: Knock sensor may also be referred to as knock sensor No. 1.

Removal and Installation (Camry)

1. Knock sensor is located on side of cylinder block, just below intake manifold. See Fig. 10.
2. Service information is not available from manufacturer. It may be necessary to remove engine with trans- axle to gain access for removal of intake manifold. For engine removal, see appropriate article in engines.
3. It may be necessary to remove intake manifold for access to knock sensor. Use Oil Pressure Switch Socket (SST 09816 30010), or equivalent, when servicing knock sensor.
4. Tighten knock sensor and intake manifold bolts/nuts (if removed) to specification. See Torque specifications.

Fig. 10: Locating Knock Sensor (Camry and Highlander)

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 8:18 PM
Tiny
MADDOG77
  • MEMBER

So, I will not have to take off the intake manifold to get to it then, right?

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 8:37 PM
Tiny
HMAC300
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Reread item 3.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 8:38 PM
Tiny
MADDOG77
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Sorry, hmac300! I did not see your response at first. It looks as though I will have to take off the intake manifold in order to get to the sensor, unless I can find an extension wrench. Why do they have to make everything so difficult and frustrating to get to?

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 8:51 PM
Tiny
HMAC300
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Because they make cars to assemble not repair. Engineers do not think that way because they have never repaired a car.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 8:53 PM
Tiny
MADDOG77
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Well said! Thanks for your help! I think I have a better understanding of where it is located and what it is going to take to get to it, now. Also, I was told that I can tap the engine block to make sure it is not just a lose wire or corrosion built up, first.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 9:11 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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If you have the correct tool then you do not need to remove the manifold.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 10:26 PM
Tiny
HMAC300
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Yes, you can do that with tapping the block.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 10:59 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
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"I was told that I can tap the engine block to make sure it is not just a lose wire or corrosion built up, first".
No, not exactly.

If you have a scan tool with the capability of monitoring the knock sensor signal, you can simulate a knock by tapping on the block and see if the computer sees it but you already know it is not because it is setting the code. It will not tell you what the issue with the circuit is though.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 11:04 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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For Toyota engines this sensor is a common failure.

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Monday, August 20th, 2012 AT 11:14 PM
Tiny
MADDOG77
  • MEMBER

KHLow2008, what is this correct tool you are referring to? It would nice to know since it will save me the trouble of having to take off the manifold.

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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 AT 2:18 AM
Tiny
MADDOG77
  • MEMBER

Would someone just tell me what they would do if they were the one replacing the part? Hopefully I will not have to remove the engine (which is mentioned above) to get to this booger. The sensor does not knock/rattle at all, so I am thinking it might just be a lose wire.

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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 AT 2:36 AM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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A 24 mm long socket with thin sides. From underneath vehicle check if you have space for an open end wrench.

Definitely you need not remove the engine.

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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 AT 6:51 AM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
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"The sensor does not knock/rattle at all, so I am thinking it might just be a lose wire".

No, you are way off with that. The sensor does not cause knocks. It tells the computer when it senses ignition ping so the computer can adjust the timing to get rid of it. The code is telling you that the sensor is not working. The tech has to diagnose the circuit to determine the reason it does not work which could be anything in the circuit. The sensor itself is the most common cause as Klow2008 pointed out.

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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 AT 9:43 AM
Tiny
MADDOG77
  • MEMBER

Okay! I was thinking I would have to get to it from on top after reading a couple of replies from above. It got me confused! It looks like the easiest way is getting to it from underneath in which all I will have to do then is unplug and unscrew it. Is this correct?

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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 AT 2:16 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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Yes, from underneath is an easier option.

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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 AT 2:20 PM
Tiny
MADDOG77
  • MEMBER

I just want to clarify, on a four cylinder engine, the knock sensor is located on the backside of the engine block, directly below the cylinder head (facing the rear of the engine compartment).

1. Disconnect the cable from the negative terminal on the battery.
2. Pinch off the coolant hoses to the throttle body before removing the intake manifold/throttle body).
3. Remove the intake manifold.
4. Disconnect the electrical connector and remove the knock sensor.
5. If you are going to reuse the old sensor, coat the threads with thread sealant. New sensors are pre-coated already. Do not apply any additional sealant or the operation of the sensor may be affected.
6. Install the knock sensor and tighten it securely (approx. 30 ft-lbs). Do not over-tighten the sensor or damage may occur. Plug in the electrical connector, refill the cooling system and check for leaks.

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Friday, August 24th, 2012 AT 5:55 PM

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