Radiator replacement

Tiny
ANONYMOUS
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 122,000 MILES
How do I replace the radiator on the vehicle listed above (Laredo with a v8)?
Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 AT 12:42 AM

11 Replies

Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Hello,

Start by disconnecting the battery and draining the coolant out. Here is a guide to show you what you are in for when doing the job with diagrams below to show you how it will be for your car:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-replace-a-car-radiator

and this video will show you how to remove the clamps.

https://youtu.be/S1q6HVe8Iw0

Check out the diagrams (below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.

Cheers
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Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 AT 2:50 AM
Tiny
ELLIEMAE9
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 JEEP CHEROKEE
Six cylinder all wheel drive automatic.

Could you give me directions on how to change the radiator in my vehicle? Do I have to disconnect the air conditioning?
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Should not have to disconnect the A/C.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/30961_1rad_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/30961_1rada_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/30961_1rad1_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/30961_1rad2_1.jpg

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+1
Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
EJYONEHARA
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 82,647 MILES
I have a Jeep Grand Cherokee that has unusual wing brackets that protrude three inches out to the side and attach to the frame. There is also the power steering housing that protrudes toward the right front (driver's side) along the frame. To remove my old leaking radiator, I was forced to cut the wing brackets that anchor the radiator (the corners curve inward) and also had to cut the lower discharge hose on the radiator in order to clear the steering wheel housing. After removing the fan shroud with cooling fan, I am still unable to fit in the new radiator due to the protruding steering wheel housing. The lower radiator hose connection protrudes approximately 1 1/4" past the steering wheel housing preventing me from sliding the radiator straight down. The winged brackets already makes a tight squeeze even pushing straight down and angling the radiator toward the front. The new radiator looks identical to the original factory installed radiator.

Questions, do I have to remove the steering wheel housing (anchored by four bolts on the frame)? Is there another way to get the radiator in short of cutting and bending the top frame? Should the front bumper be removed to slide the radiator up from underneath the car? How do professionals deal with this problem?
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KCCOZ1159
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 94,000 MILES
Grand Cherokee 4.7l with the hydraulic cooling fan. Bought a new replacement radiator. In looking at how I should go about replacement what would be the ideal (easiest) way.
1. Remove fan/shroud away from radiator then remove or?
2. Disconnect fluid cables from fan and remove fan and radiator as one unit?
3. Is there another way?

In looking at it today it is hard to get at some of these bolts/screws and to determine a plan of action.

Anyhelp would be greatly appreciated, thanks.
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
Removal steps are below.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/261618_Noname_1367.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/261618_Noname2_406.jpg

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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BILL PRESTON
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 131,765 MILES
I cannot seem to figure out how to remove the lower transmission fluid cooling line from the radiator without cutting the line. Something I do not want to do. Makes it look messed up.
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
You have to put a pair of pliers on it and twist it right on the metal until you break the rubber free. Or try and insert a small pick in the inside and work it around.
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
VAUGHN43043
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 150,000 MILES
Is it possible to ruin a brand new radiator by driving five miles with an overheated engine? I recently had my vehicle repaired for engine damage from being overheated. The garage charged me, in addition to other work, for a new radiator because they said that driving with an overheated engine had ruined the radiator. The radiator they replaced was less than six months old. Is this possible or did I get ripped off?
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
SATURNTECH9
  • EXPERT
How did they say it was damaged? Also, what was causing the overheating of the engine? If there was too much pressure caused by the engine overheating depending on why the engine was overheating it is possible. But generally no it does not ruin the radiator unless the radiator was older and weak.
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Either one is possible but I would want to see what they found before passing judgement. Radiator caps have a pressure relief valve so excessive pressure should not have been the cause of a problem. The radiator tanks look like plastic but they can withstand high temperatures, so melting should not cause a problem. Sometimes the bubbling caused by overheating can get somewhat violent and may cause a seam to let go where the tanks are crimped on. A radiator repair shop may be able to fix that but the cost might be almost as much as the cost of a new radiator.

Most experienced mechanics with good judgement will want to replace the radiator when working on an overheating problem if it was in any way involved as the cause or if it is old. They do not want to risk a repeat problem. Besides its ability to hold pressure, the cooling fins will corrode away and crumble. That reduces their ability to give up the heat to the air. If the mechanic knew the radiator was fairly new or recognized it was in like new condition, he would have had a different reason for replacing it. Typically that would be spelled out in the repair estimate before the work was started so you would have had a chance to question the need for the new radiator.

You also have to consider when, in the course of the repair, you were told a radiator was needed. If they found a leak or other damage right away, they would have told you. If they just included it because of the nature of the problem, you could have mentioned it was new. Typically we find additional damage, like leaks, well after the job is under way or almost completed, then we have to tell you more parts are needed. We do not like having to do that, and it is frustrating for car owners, but we have no choice when we find those things. Some things are impossible to know or predict ahead of time. When we do try to anticipate additional things that might be needed, like a radiator for an overheating problem, we get accused of trying to sell more parts than are needed. Either way we lose and people think we're disreputable. The best way to avoid that is with good communication and explanations but mechanics are not good at that. We speak our own language just like doctors do.

Also, old radiators are something that most customers do not want but it is customary to give old parts back to the car owners or to at least offer to give them back or to make them available for inspection. In a case like this we would recognize that you might be able to go back to a previous shop or business and discuss a partial refund if the old radiator is still under warranty. Do not assume anything because of that comment, but a mechanic will not just throw the old part out until he is sure you do not want it or you are not coming back later for it. You should be able to keep it and save it for possible future needs, and if you find nothing wrong with it, you can be happy at that time that you have it and do not have to buy another new one. Be aware too that often new parts are sold to the shops with a "core charge" meaning they are expected to give the old one back for a little credit that you did not get charged for. They work similar to pop bottles that you return for credit. You still should be allowed to inspect the part but you would be charged an additional amount if you wanted to keep it. Some parts like water pumps and generators can be rebuilt which saves you a lot of money later when you need one of those parts, but in the case of a radiator, the supplier typically takes the old one back to give the shop more money for the scrap metal than what they would get somewhere else. It is a friendly incentive for that shop to do business with that supplier in the future.

It is hard to give you a better answer because we do not know the cause of the overheating, the results of the overheating, the repairs that were needed, or the tests that led to the diagnosis. Some overheating results in warped cylinder heads and leaking head gaskets which can get real expensive real quickly. Jeep engines are not noted for big problems from a simple overheating, but anything is possible if that overheating was ignored and the driver kept driving.
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Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 AT 4:11 PM (Merged)

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