2001 Ford Windstar Starting problem

Tiny
JIM HUFFMAN SR
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD WINDSTAR
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 74,350 MILES
Put car in garage last night at 11pm. Went out to start it at noon today and it starts but will only run for
2 - 3 seconds or so and dies out. Have tried repeatedly to start it and (maybe 10 times or so) once it
without my pressing the accelerator pedal idelled very roughly like it was running only on a couple of
cyl's. Pressing accelerator pedal does not make any difference, I have had the vehicle for 4 months and
have driven it just over 3000 miles, about 50/50 town and freeway. Recent oil, filter change. Recent
transmission flush. Recent backup camera gps in dash installation. Car has run fine and the mileage
was documents prior to my purchasing it.
I would be more than happy to pay for any advice you might have. What would be an acceptable amount?
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, April 27th, 2015 AT 3:18 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
CADIEMAN
  • MEMBER
This sounds like a fuel pump problem. A eazsily tested by spraying starter fluid into the intake under the air filter. As long as u spray it will run when u stop spraying it stalls.
Fuel pressure is your problem. Start here
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, April 27th, 2015 AT 4:15 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi guys. Excuse me for butting in but I might have a few ideas. Did you try Cadieman's starting fluid test? If so, what were the results? This does sound like a fuel-related problem. One thing to look at is the fresh air tube between the air filter and the throttle body. There can't be any leaks in it. If there is, air will sneak in that isn't measured so it won't be included in the fuel metering calculations.

Many auto parts stores rent or borrow tools. Borrow a fuel pressure gauge to see exactly how much pressure you have. If it's near 0 psi, cycle the ignition switch a couple of times. Leave it on for a few seconds, then off for a few seconds. If the pressure increases a little each time you turn the ignition switch on, and it doesn't drop down right away in between, the pump might be struggling to run and it can't build pressure up fast enough. If cycling the ignition switch a few times gets the pressure up, the engine should run smoothly for a few seconds until the pressure drops back down. As I recall, around 50 pounds is normal.

You should read and record any diagnostic fault codes too. You'll need a code reader or scanner for that. When you have an engine-related problem, please list which engine you have.

If you have a coil pack, check if there's spark from one of each of the three pairs of spark plug wires. Intermittent spark from any one of the coils lends suspicion to a failing crankshaft position sensor or camshaft position sensor. Intermittent signals from one of them can cause the Engine Computer to not turn the fuel pump on steady and / or not fire the ignition coils steady. Sometimes those problems won't set a fault code unless they have failed while the stalling engine is coasting to a stop. That's where you again need a scanner to view live data to see if the computer is seeing those signals.

Cadieman will likely have some more thoughts once you have the starting fluid results.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, April 28th, 2015 AT 12:58 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides