2001 Ford F-150 help asap please

Tiny
BBUERER
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD F-150
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 177,000 MILES
My tires are p265/70r17 I switch to p275/75r16 f150 2001 now when I push on the breaks it grinds alil
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 9:09 AM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The solution should be rather obvious. Put on what the truck was designed for. Beyond that, did you switch two wheels and tires or all four? Can you tell if the grinding is a physical problem of the brake calipers rubbing on the wheels, or is it a buzzing noise from the anti-lock brakes engaging?
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 9:13 AM
Tiny
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I bought a ll 4 tires came with the rims It's not a constant noise I looked all the way around nothing looks like its rubbing it's a little tight the brake calipers but not touching
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 9:27 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The next thing would be to remove one wheel at a time, starting with the front, and look inside for witness marks to see if the caliper's mounting knuckle is rubbing. You'll see shiny streaks inside the wheel and possibly a shiny spot on the knuckle. Also look for signs the spindle is rubbing near the ball joints. There is a fix for that which involves installing spacers, but there's more to the story. I'm in a rush to head out of town, but I'll check back later to see how you're doing, and to explain the downside of using spacers.
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 9:47 AM
Tiny
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Ok thank you
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 9:50 AM
Tiny
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I did take one off the front and back there is a Lil rub mark but it's only like 3 inch long it don't go all the way around
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 10:10 AM
Tiny
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To be honest it looks like it could be the brake pad on the back it has a Lil edge sticking out witch looks like the only shiny part I'm probably gonna have to use spacers unless I can grind that down alil like I said it's just the brake pad not the calipers
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 11:05 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
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Any chance you can post a photo?

The reason I like to avoid spacers is because, as a suspension and alignment specialist, I understand how that changes "scrub radius". If you draw an imaginary line through the upper and lower ball joints as viewed from the front, that line was carefully-designed to intersect the tire tread at a very specific point on the road. That has a huge affect on steering response, handling, and braking. Scrub radius changes when you install most lift kits, install wider wheels, taller tire diameter, or wheels with a deeper offset, which includes adding spacers. No alignment specialist would ever raise his truck or lower his car. In fact, we have to get real picky about ride height and that it is within the published specs to insure there is minimal tire wear, and that we don't become party to a lawsuit.

Lawyers and insurance investigators love to find these kinds of modifications when they're trying to shift the blame for the crash from their client who ran the red light, to you. They will convince a jury that you were partly at fault because you were less able to avoid the crash, and they will be right.

That is why I'd like you to use spacers only as a last resort. I'd prefer to remove a little casting flash or non-structural metal if possible.
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Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 AT 9:44 PM

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