2000 Chrysler Grand Voyager ECM problem

Tiny
SCYNTAX
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 CHRYSLER GRAND VOYAGER
  • 3.3L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 110,000 MILES
Vehicle ran fine (don't they always). Parked for about three minutes, upon startup, engine began to misfire, depressing accelerator pedal resulted in noticable decrease in power accompanied by misfiring. Got it home, shut it off. Vehicle no longer starts. Coil pack tests ok. Plugs are wet with fuel.

Key dance indicates code 55. Not sure if this is the end of code value or an indication that the ECM is bad.

Without an OBD reader, how can I be sure this is a valid error code? And if it is, is there a way to test the ECM wiring?

Thank you
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Thursday, August 7th, 2014 AT 11:55 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Code 55 indicates the end of the test cycle. If the plugs are wet, either you are not getting spark to the plugs, the fuel pressure is too high due to a bad regulator, the coolant temp sensor is bad and causing the ECM to dump fuel, or simply.

Lets start by checking the fuel pump pressure to make sure it is within the manufacturer's specs. Also, check to make sure you are getting a good hot blue snapping spark to the plugs.

Let me know what you find.
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Thursday, August 7th, 2014 AT 8:47 PM
Tiny
SCYNTAX
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Thank you for the prompt reply.

So, since code 55 is the only code I see, that means there are no error codes being reported?

The spark is not bright blue. It is on the yellowish side. Could that mean that when the plugs are under compression, they are not sparking at all? The engine will sometimes nearly sputter to life. But as soon as the key is returned to the run position, the engine dies. Maybe the coil pack is just too weak to deliver a good spark.

I will check the fuel pressure. But I am not sure what you mean when you say "causing the ECM to dump fuel, or simply.". Could you please elaborate?

It's still curious though why no error codes are being reported.
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Thursday, August 7th, 2014 AT 10:31 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
That is correct, there are no codes. That leads me to believe there is a fuel issue. If the pump is weak or goes bad, it won't set a code.

As far as the ECM dumping fuel, I will try to explain what I meant. If the coolant temp sensor thinks it is very cold out, the ECM will respond by making the fuel mixture richer. It does that because the colder it is, the more fuel it needs to run. I had a Chevy van about 3 weeks ago that would run fine one minute and then start missing and stall and not restart. Using a live scanner, I saw that the coolant temp sensor thought it was -40 degrees F. It was causing the engine to flood with fuel.

As for the word simply, I meant to say simply the fuel pump is bad.

The spark has me a bit concerned. However, I would like to know the fuel pressure results before moving on.
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Friday, August 8th, 2014 AT 9:02 PM

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