1999 Chevrolet Silverado F U

Tiny
SPORTZNUT824
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
  • 90,000 MILES
I asked a question over 24 hours ago, but apparently you've figured out i'm a girl. So. Thanks so much for your NO HELP and i'll be sure and post on my blog, facebook, twitter, email and text how "helpful" you ARE NOT!
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Monday, June 24th, 2013 AT 3:55 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
FREEMBA
  • EXPERT
I'm sorry that you've had to wait. However, there wa s a reply on June 23rd. I hope that these replies are coming to your email and we're not having some sort of problem.

A couple of things were suggested by the expert who first responded: (1) to have the computer codes read [this will get us in the proper area for diagnosing your probem - Thankfully you local autoparts stores (autozone, advance auto parts, o'rielly's) will check the codes for FREE].
Once the codes are read, please post them here so that we can help you diagnose the problem(s).
(2) He suggested that you check the fuel pressure. Some auto parts stores will "rent" the gauge you need for this. The good thing is when you return the tool you get ALL of your money back - so in essence its free.
Please post the fuel pressure readings here as well.

By the way, the normal fuel pressure for a 2001 Silverado is 50 55 PSI.
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Monday, June 24th, 2013 AT 5:40 PM
Tiny
SPORTZNUT824
  • MEMBER
Truck is immobile, so cannot check codes unless those can be rented, don't think they can. Already rented fuel pressure gauge, it is 60, that's not the problem. Have also replaced several sensors hoping to fix the problem, no luck. :((
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Wednesday, June 26th, 2013 AT 11:08 AM
Tiny
FREEMBA
  • EXPERT
Ok, its great that you have 60 psi of fuel pressure.
Now let's check to see if you have spark at the spark plug wire(s). Here's how:

Check for a spark

In order to check for a spark at one of the spark plug wires, remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug. Connect it to a spark tester and connect the other end of the spark tester to a good engine ground (a bolt will do fine). Have an assistant to crank the engine and you should see a spark jump the gap in the spark tester. If so, the ignition system is doing its job. If not more testing of the ignition system is required.
If a spark tester is not available, remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug, put a screwdriver into the end of the spark plug wire and lay it (horizontally) on a metal part of the engine (make sure you have about a inch gap between the metal part of the screwdriver and the metal part of the engine). Have an assistant to crank the engine and you should see a spark jump from the end of the spark plug wire to the metal engine surface. If so, the ignition system is working.

I am now putting together the info you'll need to completely check the ignition system IF YOU DON'T GET A SPARK on the test above. Please let me know how this test turns out, so that I can get you the proper info. Thanks.
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Thursday, June 27th, 2013 AT 8:26 AM
Tiny
FREEMBA
  • EXPERT
Just in case you didn't get a spark (didn't see a need to wait and prolong you repair time). Also, for what it's worth; I did see your first post, it was picked up by another tech. I only saw the second post where you hadn't been helped, so I decided to offer you some advice. Let me know if you need to check the Crankshaft Sensor or any other part. Please post the results of your test or any questions you may have.

Spark Test at Ignition Coil Tower
If you have gotten a No Spark result on everything you have tested. Now, you're gonna' test for Spark directly on the Ignition Coil s tower.
1. Remove the Spark Plug Wire that's runs from the ignition coil to the distributor cap unplug it on the Dist. Cap end only leaving it attached to the ignition coil
2. Now, connect the HEI Spark Tester to the Coil's spark plug wire; grounding it to a bolt on the engine.
3. With the HEI Spark Tester in place ask your helper to crank the engine once again while you watch for Spark jumping across the air gap of the Spark Tester.
If you got Spark, Ignition Coil and the coil wire is GOOD.
If you got NO Spark. Try the same test, however use a different coil wire this time.
Now
If you got Spark, Ignition Coil, however the previous wire is bad.
If you got NO Spark. Then further testing is required to see if the problem is due to a BAD Ignition Control Module (ICM), BAD Pick Up Coil or something else.

Testing the
Ignition Coil for 12 Volts
In this test, you re going to verify that both the Ignition Coil and Ignition Control Module (ICM) are being supplied with power (12 Volts), since both are fed this voltage thru the same circuit. You can use either a Multimeter or a Test Light.
1. With your Multimeter in VOLTS DC mode.
2. With the RED multimeter test lead probe (or backprobe -- I use a straight pin to pierce the plastic casing of the wire so that I get a good connection and clip the multimeter to the straight pin)
3. With the wire identified with the letter A on the connector. This should be the PINK wire of the Ignition Coil connector.
4. Connect the BLACK lead of the Multimeter to the Battery (-) Negative Terminal.
5. Ask your assistant to turn the Key On with the Engine Off.
6. You should see 12 Volts on the multimeter. Do you have 12 volts?
If your Multimeter displayed 12 Volts, the next step is to check to verify that the Ignition Coil is being fed with the Switching Signal that comes from the Ignition Control Module (ICM
If your Multimeter DID NOT display 12 Volts, you must find out why you're missing this voltage. Without this voltage neither the Ignition Control Module (ICM) nor the Ignition Coil will work. Check the ENG 1 and the ECM 1 fuse(s) in the underhood fuse box [Power Distribution Box], also check for an IGN fuse in the interior fuse box.
Verifying the
Ignition Coil's Switching Signal
For the Ignition Coil to start Sparking, it needs a Switching Signal from the Ignition Control Module. This Signal is verified, as being sent to the Ignition Coil, with an LED light. You can make you own LED light tool for very, very little money ( instructions at end of this post)
1. This test is performed with the Ignition Coil and Ignition Control Module connected to their respective connectors.
2. Connect the BLACK lead of the LED Light to the wire (circuit) identified with the letter C in the Ignition Coil connector. (I use a straight pin to pierce the plastic casing of the wire so that I get a good connection and clip the alligator clip of my Led to the straight pin)
3. This is usually a Black with White stripe wire.
4. Connect RED lead of LED to the Battery (+) Positive terminal. It is IMPORTANT that it be connected at the Battery Positive Terminal.
5. Have an assistant crank the engine.
If everything is working like it should, the LED Light will blink on and off the whole time the engine is being cranked. Don t worry about what the LED Light does before or after your helper starts cranking the engine. The only results you re interested in interpreting are the results obtained with the engine cranking.
If the LED flashed On and Off, then the Ignition Coil is BAD, replace it. This also means that the Ignition Control Module (ICM) and Pick Up Coil are GOOD. Replacing the Ignition Coil will solve your No Spark/No Start Condition.
If the LED DID NOT flash On and Off, re-check all of your connections and retry the test again.
If after the second or third tests the LED still does not flash try this:
Testing the
Triggering Signal from PCM
You have verified that the Module indeed has power being fed to it. In this test, you re going to verify that the PCM (Powertrain Control Module=Fuel Injection Computer) is sending the Ignition Control Module the Triggering Signal it needs to activate the Ignition Coil.
1. With the Battery in a fully charged condition and with the key in the Off Position.
2. Connect the BLACK wire of the LED Light to the wire labeled with the letter B of the Ignition Control Module (ICM) connector with an appropriate tool (straight pin).
3. The RED wire of the LED goes to the BATTERY (+) POSITIVE terminal.
4. Have your helper crank the engine while you observe the LED.
If the LED Light flashed on and off as the engine cranked, this confirms that the Ignition Control Module (ICM) is fried and needs to be replaced. Replacing it will solve your No Spark - No Start problem.
If the LED Light DID NOT flash on and off as the engine cranked, recheck all of your connections. If still no flashes from the LED Light, this indicates one of three things (as the possible causes of this missing signal): 1) A BAD Crankshaft Position Sensor or 2) an open in this circuit between the Ignition Module and the PCM or 3) a BAD PCM, although this is rare.

To make the LED light tester

Purchase an LED light fro Radio Shack [or electronics supply store]. Purchase an automotive type LED with a built in resistor. The LED is polarity specific, so when you solder the wires onto it be sure to use a black alligator clip on the NEG wire and a red clip on the POS wire, to prevent you from getting then confused. Once the wires are soldered on and the clips are in place you re set.
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Thursday, June 27th, 2013 AT 10:26 AM

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