Replace radiator fan motor

Tiny
MARMARO
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • 92,500 MILES
I have to replace a radiator fan motor on my 1998 Lincoln Continental. After looking at a possible start point to do the job, I was thinking I would be better off removing the entire bumper-grill assembly. Any ideas? Thanks.
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Wednesday, August 31st, 2011 AT 10:57 AM

34 Replies

Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Hello,

They say you might be able to remove the radiator fan motor without having to remove the radiator but just in case here are two guides to help walk you through both and diagrams below to show you how its done in your car.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/replace-electric-fan-motor

and

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-replace-a-car-radiator

Check out the diagrams (Below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.

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Wednesday, August 31st, 2011 AT 12:18 PM
Tiny
PHYLLIS LALLY
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 95,000 MILES
How to you replace a radiator fan on my car?
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:39 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
See pictures for instructions.
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:39 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CJBOBS
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • V8
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 114,000 MILES
Can I replace the radiator fan motor without
replaceing the compleat fan assembly
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:39 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JJMONTANEZ
  • MEMBER
Nope I went through that before and I had to replace the whole assembly. Not that hard but it is a little tricky. If you have done work on cars before you should be able to take it out and back in a couple of hours. Good luck
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:39 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BOBSIMS
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • V8
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 121,000 MILES
I need to know how to install the cooling fan.
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/261618_Noname_2073.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/261618_Noname2_668.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/261618_Noname3_258.jpg

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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
DAD2ABI
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • V8
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 154,000 MILES
Alright first the electric cooling fan locked up an started smoking almost catchin fire so I foun them an changed them out the car would run fine for a while till the thermostat will open then straight to overheating I changed the themostat twice an had the water pump changed I cant figure out what is causing it to run hot it wasnt doing none of this before the fan locked up an almost caught fire thanx Please Help
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
The cooling fan is it working properly? Thermostat installed correctly/water pump doing its job/radiator not clogged up if so do below

Have it block and pressure tested-do the block first to pinpoint a combustion leaking into the cooling system or a gas analyzer to sniff for hydrocarbons at the radiator fill neck.

Pressure test: do not do a pressure test if there's leakage at the headgasket this might cause coolant into the cylinders and lock it up or bend a connecting rod if cranked thereafter. The headgasket should be repaired before doing the pressure test.

If the block and pressure test passes check the following:, Pressure test the Rad. Cap, Clogged radiator, air lock in the cooling system, Fan clutch, Radiator electrical fan, collaspe hoses, water pump.

Have tried bleeding it?

Always bleed air from cooling system after replacing coolant. Set heater for maximum heat. Remove radiator cap. Loosen drain plug and remove drain bolt (if equipped) from engine block. Drain coolant reservoir. Fill coolant reservoir to MAX mark with 50/50 water-coolant mixture. Loosen bleed bolt and fill radiator up to base of filler neck. Close bleed bolt when coolant flows out without bubbles. Tighten bleed bolt. With radiator cap removed, start and operate engine to normal operating temperature. Add coolant if necessary and check for leaks.
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
TMCG2121
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • V8
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 98,291 MILES
I have a 98 Lincoln continental which recently developed a problem with the cooling fan which is located right next to the radiator. Whenever the car is running the fan is turned on high and stays on high.

The owner manual said the High and Low relays were right near the power distribution box but there is no sign of those two relays. I called the local Lincoln dealership and they told me that it was not near the power distribution box but more in the center of the car near the radiator?

I was unable to locate the relay or resistor. I was wondering if this could be the problem and where that resistor or relay is? Or is this caused by something else?
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MICHELD
  • MEMBER
Take your black cover off from the front of the engine, it holds on with velcro. There's a bracket with 1 screw/bolt that you have to remove. Just remove the bolt and it pulls away and it located on that bracket. There a cover that you have to remove. The high speed fan relay I believe is the passenger side. The high speed relay is only used when the car reaches 225 and will come on and drop the temp down to 208. The fans will come on in A/C mode in low speed and stay on until the car gets enough air to cool it down.
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MICHELD
  • MEMBER
Take your black cover off from the front of the engine, it holds on with velcro. There's a bracket with 1 screw/bolt that you have to remove. Just remove the bolt and it pulls away and it located on that bracket. There a cover that you have to remove. The high speed fan relay I believe is the passenger side. The high speed relay is only used when the car reaches 225 and will come on and drop the temp down to 208. The fans will come on in A/C mode in low speed and stay on until the car gets enough air to cool it down.
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
AH_NE_COGA1962
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • 1,249,870 MILES
How do I test cooling fans and relays
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RENEE
  • ADMIN
You must use a test light to check for power and ground. Here is a guide that will help you:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-use-a-test-light-circuit-tester

Here is another guide which is for a blower motor but uses the same theory:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/blower-motor-testing

Please let us know hat you find so it can help others.

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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
EPICTATUS
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 LINCOLN CONTINENTALLINCOLN CONTINENTAL
1998 Continental 4.6L; Mileage: 118000

After purchasing the car I noticed that neither of the two radiator cooling fan motors were turning on when the car warmed up and the motor would begin to overheat when the car wasn't moving. After further investigation I discovered that the RH (passenger side) radiator fan motor was seized. Even though the LH (Driver side) fan motor was in good condition, it did not turn on when the motor got hot so I replaced both fan relays (low fan & high fan) along with the RH fan motor and engine coolant thermostat.

Now, both fan motors turn on at high speed moments after I start the car and stay on anytime the motor is running. Needless to say, the motor does not overheat, and the needle always stays in the center of the operating range. Also, when I put the original fan relays back in, both fans worked the same way as with the new relays, so apparently the relays were not blown.

So I went from a situation where the radiator fans would not turn on, to one where they won't shut off (though preferable).

What else should I be looking at?

I replaced the engine coolant sensor as you suggested, but the "always on" issue is still present.
What else?
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
The PCM turns the fans on and off, might want to try a Coolant Sensor, could be out of range causing the PCM to think it is hot enough to turn them on
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MERLETRENT
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • V8
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 135,000 MILES
My 1999 cooling fans stay on all the time. I bought the car that way, mistake. I have checked the relays, they work fine. I was on a trip and started smelling something burning. I pulled over and found a fire in the pass side cooling fan. I had to pour washer fluid on the motor to put it out. I unplugged the fans so it wouldn't happen again. I have replaced the fans but it will wear these out to if I don't find out why the fans won't cycle like they are supposed to. Any feedback would help. Thx
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
LEGITIMATE007
  • EXPERT
Yeah, your engine coolant temperature sensor could be giving a high reading to the computer making it keep the fans on all the time. You see that sensor tells the computer how hot the coolant is, well if the sensor is faulty, then it could be telling the computer that the coolant is hot all the time, thus making the computer keep the fans on all the time. Start with your engine coolant temperature sensor first. And let me know what happens
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RANDY PETERSON
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • 3.8L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 145,000 MILES
I replaced the original cooling fan (3 wire) with a 2 wire. In essence, I replaced the 2 speed fan with a single speed fan. Should I hook up the single speed fan to the wire that supplys low speed or to the wire that supplies high speed. I know which is which and the one that is ground. Or should the high and low speed wires be connected together and then connected to to the motor? Thank you in advance for any insight you may have!

Email: sonofpeter57@gmail. Com
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I would start by connecting them together and using both. On most circuits, you get 12 volts on the low-speed wire first, then, when the high-speed is needed, that wire gets 12 volts and the low-speed wire drops to 0 volts. With your original two-speed motor, you don't want 12 volts on both wires at the same time as that would, in effect, short out part of the motor. If that is how your car works, and you only use the low-speed wire, your new fan will run at full speed at first when the fan is first needed, but that circuit will turn off when the high speed is needed. That would result in overheating at low car speeds. If you only used the high-speed circuit, the engine would have to become undesirably hot before the fan turned on. Eventually you could entice a warped cylinder head and leaking head gasket.

If tying the two wires together causes a problem, I can draw up a circuit using two relays to run the fan motor. You will not damage anything, but the Engine Computer on your car might monitor these lines for proper operation, and it might detect voltage on one wire when it should not be there. I do not know that for a fact, but if it were to occur, I will have a solution.
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Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 AT 5:40 PM (Merged)

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