Noise

Tiny
JUJU
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 OLDSMOBILE BRAVADA
  • 4 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
My 1997 Oldsmobile Bravada makes a noise that is more like something rubbing as the front driver side tire is rotated, regardless of speed you can hear this. Sounds like every rotation of the wheel then it rubs whatever is making the noise. What is causing this?
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Friday, July 22nd, 2011 AT 7:34 AM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That's impossible to say over a computer. Do you hear it just when driving or have you had the vehicle jacked up and spun the wheel by hand? You could have a brake caliper bolt that fell out and the caliper is lifting up and rubbing on the inside of the wheel. There could nothing more than a patch of rust on the back side of the brake rotor. The cv joint boot could be badly torn and flopping around. The best approach is to have it inspected at a tire and alignment shop.
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Friday, July 22nd, 2011 AT 8:38 AM
Tiny
JUJU
  • MEMBER
Only happens when driving, haven't had it jacked up or looked at prior. Told after asking this, that it is a wheel barring. Thank you for your response.
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Friday, July 22nd, 2011 AT 11:02 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Wheel bearing noise is common but your description doesn't exactly match the typical symptoms. They will sound like an airplane engine, but unless they're really bad, you won't hear it below about 25 mph.

First I'd raise all four tires off the ground, then run it in gear to listen for the noise. If it's a wheel bearing, you won't hear it with the weight off of it. You CAN hear it by listening next to it with a stethoscope. It won't be nearly as loud but you'll tell the difference between it and the one on the other side. If you can hear the noise when standing by the rotating wheel, inspect the brake rotor.

You can also check at the auto parts stores that rent or borrow tools to see if they have a "Chassis Ear". That is a set of six microphones, a switch box, and head phones. You place the microphones at suspect points, then switch between them while listening on a test drive. By moving them around you can zero in on the source of the noise.
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Friday, July 22nd, 2011 AT 10:40 PM
Tiny
JUJU
  • MEMBER
Have since had it looked at and researched it some more. The tie rod end needs replaced and the brake booster may need replaced, if the vacummn hoses don't have a leak etc; tommorrow will know for sure.
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Sunday, August 7th, 2011 AT 5:44 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Do you mean "needs to be replaced" or "was" replaced? Neither of the parts you mentioned will cause the noise you originally described.
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Sunday, August 7th, 2011 AT 7:50 PM

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