1997 Acura Integra Timing Belt

Tiny
LLO012365
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 ACURA INTEGRA
  • 1.8L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 132,000 MILES
I had my timing belt and water pump replaced at 90K miles in July 2006 for the first time. So that was after 9 years and 90K miles on the original belt. So another 9 years has passed and I have 132K miles so I have only had 42K miles on the current timing belt (purchased an OEM belt) after 9 years. Can I wait to replace the timing belt or should I have it done very soon?

Also my cruise control stopped working. Do you have suggestions on how to trouble shoot that. Maybe a burnt out fuse perhaps?

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Monday, August 24th, 2015 AT 4:06 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The mileage is more important than the age, since mileage means the engine is running, and that's when wear takes place. I'd be pretty nervous though waiting for 90,000 miles. In the past, Honda recommended replacing the timing belt at 75,000 miles, and they typically broke at 65,000 miles. This is an "interference" engine. That means if the timing belt breaks, the open valves get hit and bent by the pistons as they coast to a stop. That turns an expensive repair into a real expensive repair.

For the cruise control, the fastest approach is to connect a scanner to view "inputs and outputs". That will show if pressed switches are being recognized. Some scanners also show the "reason for last cutout". If, for example, it shows "speed is too low", that's because the car is standing still, but if it still shows that during a test drive, you'd look at anything associated with the speed sensor circuit.
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Monday, August 24th, 2015 AT 5:41 PM
Tiny
LLO012365
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I asked two Acura dealers on the recommendation for timing belt replacement and I was told 5 years or 100K miles from one and 6 years or 90K miles from the other. I am concerned about being 3 or 4 years beyond recommended since it is a rubber belt. Tires dry rot after a number of years so maybe the timing belt does likewise. Do you think I will be safe to go until I reach 60K even if it takes another 3 or 4 years or total of 12 or 13 years for the current timing belt?

I don't have a scanner to trouble shoot cruise control. Where do I get the scanner or do I need to have a mechanic look at it?
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Monday, August 24th, 2015 AT 7:10 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You can rent or borrow tools from a lot of auto parts stores. They might have a scanner you can use, otherwise you'll need to go to a mechanic for a diagnosis.

My opinion is I'm less worried about dry-rot with a timing belt because that's more to do with the sun beating on the rubber. My daily driver is a rusty trusty '88 Grand Caravan 272,000 miles. The timing belt was replaced only once due to a failed water pump that it drove. The difference is my engine is not an interference engine, (nor will I ever own one). At worst I'll be walking home, but I won't have to pull the engine apart to replace bent valves. (Are you listening you idiot engineers?)!

I also have a '93 Dynasty with 4,500 miles. That timing belt is over 22 years old, but I don't have any worries when I drive that car every other year.

You have to remember too that a rubber belt would snap as soon as you tried to run the engine. It's the cords inside that give it its strength, and those don't dry-rot.
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Monday, August 24th, 2015 AT 7:34 PM

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