1996 Plymouth Voyager break preportioning valve

Tiny
THEDONJ
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 200,000 MILES
Fluid leaks from the black rubbery plug located at the back end of the break proportioning valve.

we live outside of town and only have access to the one vehicle. As it stands there is no breaks at all. We cannot get into town for a new part, or afford a tow truck for the distance it would have to be towed. A taxi is out of the question as well as we are on a pension :(

is there a way to get at least front breaks? Is there a way to fix this small black rubbery part?

as I mess with it I find the black plug associated with the rear proportioning valve spins and wiggles a bit, while the one for the front is very solid in place. Is there a way to pull this out and jam something in to solid it temporarily. Perhaps tape? Or is it just a cap? I know its probably not recommended but sadly there is no choice as we are elderly and without a vehicle. There is no way for us to get a new part, groceries, or anything.

i have attached a picture close to the exact part I am talking about. You can notice the black parts on the ends. This is where the leak is. One side of this part leaks while the other is fine.
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Friday, January 24th, 2014 AT 11:05 AM

4 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The photo didn't show up, and it sure would be helpful. Trucks and minivans use a height-sensing proportioning valve in front of the left rear wheel. Problems with them are very uncommon. My daily driver is one of the last '88 Grand Caravans left in Wisconsin, the road salt capital of the world, and that valve has never leaked. The problem is, if it does, depending on where the leak is, each rear brake is on a different hydraulic system so you will lose brake fluid to one front wheel too, but you shouldn't lose brakes to all four wheels.

Check the level in the master cylinder reservoir. If it is empty, you might get some brakes by adding but you won't want to drive it any further than necessary, and certainly not where you might have to stop in a hurry. I've nursed my van through rush-hour traffic already, to get home, by using the parking brake, but that only works the rear brakes, and those only provide up to 20 percent of the normal stopping power. It is still not advisable to drive the van like that on purpose.

Proportioning valves are going to be a dealer-only item because there are so many variables that go into selecting one with the right pressure. If you get one from a salvage yard, you'll have the best chance of getting the right one if it comes from a van with the same year, wheel base, engine size, tire size, and weight distribution based on optional equipment like air conditioning and trailer towing package.

When you check the brake fluid level, look at the rubber bladder seal inside the cap. If that is blown up and mushy, the fluid has been contaminated with a petroleum product. That is a real expensive repair because every rubber part that contacts the fluid must be replaced and all the metal parts like the steel lines must be flushed and dried.
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Friday, January 24th, 2014 AT 11:53 AM
Tiny
THEDONJ
  • MEMBER
I tried again to add the picture of the valve. :/ It basically appears to be 2 silver boxes side by side held held together by some kind of mount wich you would use to mount it to the bottom of the car. You called it :P its by the left rear tire. At the end of each box you will notice (if the picture shows) little black parts on the ends of them. The black part is kind of rubbery feeling and the fluid comes out of the one but not the other.

The "attach picture" option at the bottom now shows "valve. Jpg" it should work :/ I feel if I could seal this rubber piece, the leaking would stop lol.

There is a rubber piece on the back of each silver box. The one feels very solid while the other rubber piece seems to kind of wobble and wiggle. Because im not familiar with the part, I do not know if sealing this with quick dry cement or something will cause further trouble.
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Saturday, January 25th, 2014 AT 10:58 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I was a suspension and alignment, and brake specialist at a Chrysler dealership from 1989 through most of 1999, then I taught Automotive Brakes for nine years, and I have never seen one of these fail. If only one part of it is leaking you still should have half of the brakes unless the master cylinder ran empty. The left rear and the right front are on one hydraulic system.

The brake fluid pushes on an internal spring-loaded piston. That piston moves when enough pressure is reached and it blocks the port to the wheel to prevent more pressure from getting through. There is no need to have a port or passage to atmospheric pressure, so what is probably leaking is a passage that had to be drilled from the outside, then the access hole was sealed. My guess is epoxy would seal it enough for a temporary fix of you can get it completely dried off, but under hard braking, you can develop over 2000 pounds of fluid pressure. I wouldn't trust any kind of repair other than to replace the assembly.
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Sunday, January 26th, 2014 AT 12:15 AM
Tiny
THEDONJ
  • MEMBER
Thank you good sir. Yeah we have half the breaks lol just going the distance from home to thunder bay ontario, which is the closest city, will easily eat through 3 bottles of break fluid -_- but we can get our son to drive us into town. Thank you for your information
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Sunday, January 26th, 2014 AT 4:09 PM

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