Its a 3

Tiny
ANONYMOUS
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY
  • 24,500 MILES
Its a 3.8, is there a coil sensor, if so where is it located, code po340
Sunday, December 9th, 2012 AT 12:54 AM

7 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
P0340 Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Malfunction

Follow the upper radiator hose to the thermostat housing on the passenger side of the engine. The cam sensor is in between that housing and the engine mounting bracket. It will have three wires.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, December 9th, 2012 AT 1:06 AM
Tiny
JAYKARO
  • MEMBER
I put new, coil, cam sensor&crank sensor, still the same
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
-1
Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 AT 12:12 AM
Tiny
JAYKARO
  • MEMBER
Start&run but misses, 2 top post of coil, no fire
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 AT 12:13 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Did you use a paper spacer with the new crank sensor, or did it have a thin plastic rib molded to the end?

What does "no fire" mean? If the engine runs, there has to be voltage to the ignition coil, and the cam and crank sensors have to be working. Those sensors won't cause a misfire.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 AT 1:09 AM
Tiny
JAYKARO
  • MEMBER
It had a thing on the end of sensor
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 AT 4:31 AM
Tiny
JAYKARO
  • MEMBER
There is no fire coming of the 2 top post on coil, pull plug wirs off, nothing, pull the other 4 wires off you get a jolt
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 AT 4:34 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Normally no spark from just one coil is due to the coil assembly itself but since you already tried a new one, I'd suspect a broken wire between it and the Engine Computer. That should be detected by the computer and it should set a related fault code. Since it hasn't done that, you might suspect a problem inside the computer itself. It's more likely you'll find a corroded terminal in a connector, or a stretched terminal. The best way to find those is to unplug the connector right at the computer and make resistance measurements for all three circuits. If they all read about the same, suspect the computer. Be careful when sticking meter probes into the terminals because that's the most common way they get spread, then they don't make good contact with their mating terminals.

You can also use a scanner to command the computer to fire each coil without cranking the engine. If all of them fire when requested, that proves the computer, its control circuitry, and the coils are working. The top suspect then would be a cracked flex plate. Usually they won't just spin freely; they can shift position just enough that the crankshaft position sensor doesn't read some of the notches in it that tell the computer which coil to fire and when.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, December 12th, 2012 AT 1:43 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides