Complete power shortage

Tiny
JUSTUS TEDESCO
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 1.5L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 102,000 MILES
When I turn my key to turn on the accessories switch or start the car, nothing comes on, no dash lights, no radio, no sounds, no electrical humming, no lights, no clicks, nothing. It is like I never put the key in.

It has a new alternator, new main fuse (the one that screws into fuse box), new battery fuse, new ignition fuse, new spark plugs, battery has been tested and holds a full charge. I even replaced the electrical portion of the ignition switch. Still nothing.

There is absolutely no life to the car, wont jump, wont turn over. Not even a door open or key in the ignition annoying beeping sound.

I tested every single fuse port in both fuse boxes.

The fuse box underneath the hood, when I tested the male posts of the fuse box (where the female fuses push onto, the bigger size fuses, 30a, 50a, etc)
Each fuse port has two male posts.

I tested both posts individually by holding the black stick of the multimeter to the positive terminal of the battery, and placing the red stick of the multimeter on each post.

I have the multimeter set to the ohm reader setting where it will just beep to tell me there s connectivity between my two points of contact.

So I am testing each port in the fuse box, both posts in each port give me a beep back. Except for the right side post in the ignition fuse port.

The left post in that port gives me a beep but the right one does not.

Is this one single post my problem? If agreed, what is my next step?

Find the wire connected to the faulty post
And test to see where the current stops?

Because the wire could possibly be cracked or cut an grounding the power out before getting to the post?

please help I am so stumped and I cannot find anyone who has any experience on how to repair this problem.

The car is in Las Vegas.

Any help is much appreciated and thank you for taking the time.

JT860
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Saturday, December 3rd, 2016 AT 8:24 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Your test method is not something I can follow. Resistance readings must only be taken in circuits that are not connected to the battery or power source. Voltage readings are almost always taken with the black negative probe on the negative post of the battery, or a paint-free point on the body or engine. You might learn a valuable clue with the way you are doing it, but I cannot determine where to send you next.

Instead, based on your thorough description of the symptoms, (thank you), follow the smaller positive battery wire from the battery post to the under-hood fuse box. Be sure that connection is clean and tight. That is by far the biggest cause of this problem.

Also follow the smaller negative battery wire to the body and be sure that connection is not rusty. If that does not solve this, I will dig out a wiring diagram and figure where to start testing.
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Saturday, December 3rd, 2016 AT 11:12 PM
Tiny
JUSTUS TEDESCO
  • MEMBER
What is the correct test methods I should be performing?

I will also try your suggestion with the battery wires and let you know my results.

To add a back story;

Alternator went, so I replaced it,
2 days later, alternator fuse fries (the one that screws into the fuse box), I replaced the fuse and jumped the car, car ran perfect. Went home then went to work. Upon pulling into a parking spot, my car ran fine. Once I shut the car off normally, I turned the key to ACCESSORY to just listen to music and nothin, no life. Car is is now in current state described in previous detail.

Could the alternator be hooked up wrong or faulty? So its not charging the battery. And after putting in the new one, the car ran fine till the old alternator fuse popped, then I replaced the fuse and it worked fine again after jumping the car then I went home got ready for work and went to work. And thats when it died after pulling into the parking spot.

In that time I got it running after the fuse popped. If the alternator was hooked up wrong or faulty would it cause the problems I have previously descibed? And now im just running around tryin to find the "new" problem when its actually an old problem?

Sorry, I hope I made sense.

JT860
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Monday, December 5th, 2016 AT 10:19 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The clinker here is it took a while for that huge fuse to blow. That fuse is going to blow if the wrench contacts the large output terminal on the back of the generator and a metal part on the engine at the same time, AND only if the battery is not disconnected. To blow at a later time, it is always possible something was assembled incorrectly inside the generator, or a part is failing, but that is not common. More likely, I would start by looking at that terminal to see if it is close to touching a metal part and engine vibration is causing it to touch intermittently.

Something uncommon to consider is most cars are available with more than one generator. If yours came with a smaller, (electrically), generator, the appropriate fuse would have been installed. Most of the time a larger generator is the same physical size and bolts right onto the engine. It will work just fine except for those very rare occasions when it needs to develop its maximum output current. That is when that current might exceed the fuse's rating. Typically this only happens when performing a "full-load output current" test, but the mechanic would catch that.

It costs the manufacturer more to initially install the bigger generator on millions of cars, so they use the smallest one that will do the job. When it comes to rebuilding used generators, it costs that company the same amount of time and parts regardless which size they're rebuilding, so they like to just rebuild the bigger ones so more applications are covered. That means it is possible to get a bigger replacement generator than you had.

Under all driving conditions the generator will only develop exactly as much current as the car's electrical system needs. A bigger generator will not develop more current than a smaller one. It simply has a bigger capacity to develop more current. For that reason, if you should find you do have a larger generator, you can be safe in installing a larger fuse without worrying about the size of the output wire.

You might also want to follow that wire from the fuse to the back of the generator to see if it is bare or pinched anywhere.
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Monday, December 5th, 2016 AT 10:59 PM
Tiny
JUSTUS TEDESCO
  • MEMBER
Could it be the starter relay?
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Saturday, December 10th, 2016 AT 11:32 PM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Hey Justus,

I know this sounds kind of simple but I have seen where the battery will short out internally and cause the problem you have described. The car will not even jump, how old is the battery?

Best, Ken
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Monday, December 12th, 2016 AT 10:18 AM
Tiny
JUSTUS TEDESCO
  • MEMBER
Figured it out, thanks for the help!
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Monday, December 12th, 2016 AT 10:31 AM
Tiny
JUSTUS TEDESCO
  • MEMBER
That wire wasnt crimped and connected properly, was hidden by electrical tape by the previosu owner
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Monday, December 12th, 2016 AT 10:32 AM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
You da man! Nice work.

Please use 2CarPros anytime, we are here to help and tell a friend.

Best, Ken
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Monday, December 12th, 2016 AT 10:42 AM

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