Water leak

Tiny
ALEXTURER
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 FORD F-150
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 200,000 MILES
Water leak on a 1995 f150 near exaust manifold
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Friday, July 15th, 2011 AT 5:57 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Is this clear water or green coolant? Someone's going to have to physically look at it to locate the source. If it's on the left side, suspect a corroded core plug. If it's on the right, same thing, but it could also be as simple as a leaking heater hose or loose hose clamp. If it's leaking near the firewall on the right side, possible leaking heater core.

If it's clear water near the right tire, that would condensed moisture from the air conditioning which is normal.
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Friday, July 15th, 2011 AT 6:58 PM
Tiny
ALEXTURER
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My father and I got up underneath the truck and as fast as you pour water in the radiator thats how fast the water comes out, it pours out heavy on the right side could it be the water pump because we couldn't see there was a metal case blocking visibility and the oppertunity to visably see or plug the source my finger
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Friday, July 15th, 2011 AT 7:50 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
A water pump can leak at a pretty good clip but not as fast as you can pour water in. It's at the front of the engine too, not the side. My best guess is you have a core plug that popped out or is corroded. Replacements are very inexpensive but you have to get the correct size for your engine, and naturally the one that leaks is always the hardest one to get to.

Before you go shopping for a new plug, remove the stuff that's in the way so you can see the leak and be sure that's what you need. The guys at the auto parts stores will be able to select the right size plug and they will likely have a drawing showing the location of all of them. If they don't, visit an engine machine shop for that information.

There are special tools for installing the new plug without deforming the soft metal, but if you're careful, you can pound them in with a large socket that just matches the outer lip diameter. Watch how far the others are pressed in so you don't go too far. The new plug starts out being a little too big so you might want to start with a little bigger socket. Once the edge of the lip is flush with the side of the block, switch to a slightly smaller socket that will just sneak inside the hole so you can keep pounding until the edge of the lip is recessed about 1/8".

I like to put a thin ring of silicone gasket sealer around the new plug but that shouldn't really be necessary. Since they are so inexpensive, you might want to buy a second plug for a spare but don't expect to have to replace all of them. It seems to be common for one to corrode through and the others look like new when they are removed.
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Friday, July 15th, 2011 AT 8:10 PM

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