1992 Ford Probe 92 Electrical Problem?

Tiny
MMAULTSBY
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 FORD PROBE
  • 80,000 MILES
92 Ford Probe with possible electrical problem. Initially, would have some sputtering of the engine after it heats up (I live in PHX AZ). Finally, while at work, when left at idle for a longer time, it died and wouldn't start. We replaced the fuel pump, and that did not fix the problem. We then replaced the Ignition Coil, Rotor, Distributor Cap. At first this "fixed" the problem. Still sometimes had a sputter but nothing very bad (this was about a month and a half ago). Now after running for about 5 minutes, under about 45 MPH, the engine very badly sputters, goes from about 0-2,000 RPM up and down very quickly and then dies. If I am on the freeway and maintain about 2,900 RPM it will have some sputters but will not die. Fortunately, if the car does die while at low RPM, it will start right back up with no problem.

We have checked the Spark Plugs, Cleaned the contacts on the ignition coil, distributor cap, checked the 02 sensor. Any other ideas as to what this could be. Thanks!
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Saturday, August 24th, 2013 AT 1:43 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Check the fresh air tube between the mass air flow sensor and throttle body for cracks or leaks. If any air sneaks into the engine that doesn't go through the mass air flow sensor, there won't be fuel added to go with it.
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Saturday, August 24th, 2013 AT 2:01 PM
Tiny
MMAULTSBY
  • MEMBER
We have thoroughly checked the fresh air tube and found no leaks. The check engine light flashes momentarily when it dies. It is not a slow loss of power, in the blink of an eye the engine has turned off and come back on. There are also no error codes stored in the ECC. It seems electrical?
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Saturday, August 24th, 2013 AT 3:39 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You have to have a loss of fuel pressure, spark, compression, or camshaft timing. We know, obviously, it's not a loss of compression or timing because those wouldn't be intermittent. Replacing parts in the fuel supply system and the ignition system indicates no one has actually diagnosed anything. The first thing you need to do, especially in the absence of fault codes, is to get it to stall and not restart again, then see if you have spark. Fuel pumps on Ford products usually aren't intermittent but a number of parts in the ignition system can be.

Except for really rare circumstances the distributor cap and rotor will not cause the engine to stall completely. The fact though that the engine ran better for a while after working in that area suggests the possibility that something like a loose connection, corroded splice, or stretched terminal in a connector was disturbed enough to let it work for a while.

I'm not sure what to make of the rising engine speed. That would be typical of a vacuum leak but those usually aren't intermittent.
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Sunday, August 25th, 2013 AT 1:02 AM

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