Mechanics

REAR BRAKE ROTORS

2004 Nissan Quest • 6 cylinder FWD Automatic • 81,000 miles

I`m changing my rear brake rotors for the first time. I removed the caliper and I`m having difficulty getting a good swing with my mallet to knock the rear rotor off. Mind you I`m doing this in my drive way and I dont have a lift so, my swing is not a 100%.I used my air compressor to blow out the loose dirt & rust. I sprayed penetrating oil & brake fluid between the rotor & hub & let it soak overnight. The next day I used my hammer & gave some swings between the lugs to loosen everything up. Still no luck removing the rotor. It seems like there is a retaining screw but, the head of the screw might be a specialty type. Does this vehicle require a specialty type socket to remove the rotor? The replacement rotors dont have a screw hole for this retaing screw, if there even is one.I`m at my wits end. What can I do. Can I rent this socket or do I have to by one? H-E-L-P!
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Hemispheres11
February 19, 2011.




Do you see two threaded holes in your new rotors. They would be between the holes for the studs. Normally there are two philips screws to remove, then you run a pair of metric bolts in the holes. When you tighten the bolts, they pull the rotor off. To avoid rounding the bolt slots off, use an impact driver. That is a hand-held handle with a screwdriver bit that you hit with a hammer. The tool forces the bit to turn just a little when you hit it.

Caradiodoc


Caradiodoc
Feb 19, 2011.
My new rotors do not have holes between the holes for the studs. The rear brake rotors that I m working on are original and are being changed for the first time.I have seen your description before and I know what you re talking about. Thats why I purchased the rotors & pads myself thinking thats what I had to do but, my situation is nothing like what you have described. There is only one screw on the original rear brake rotor. The retaining screw that is on the rotor is strange to me, I ve never seen this type of screw head before. Can you tell me if this screw needs a specialty type socket tool. Can you find out if I have to rent it from someplace or do I have to purchase it from Nissan ( which I dont want to do ) and being that there is only one retaining screw it is still going to be almost impossible to remove cause only one side will be pushing out making it cocked or start to come out crooked. Do you know anyone from Nissan that might be able help you give me an answer because your reply did not help me at all.


Tiny
Hemispheres11
Feb 21, 2011.
Can you describe that screw head? Do you know what a torx head looks like? That is a six-pointed slot similar to a four-pointed philips but it's not tapered like a philips screwdriver.

Look very closely at the studs right where they come through the rotor. If you see a bunch of serrations near the base of each one, the rotor and hub are held together by them. For that style you must pop off the bearing cap and axle nut, slide the hub and rotor off as an assembly, then pound out each stud to separate the two parts. Chrysler rear drums were held on that way for many years. Those studs hold the rotor on so tightly you can mount the whole assembly on a brake lathe and make a nice true cut. Many people have tried pounding that type of drum or rotor off but all they managed to do was bend them. Ford used that style too for a while.

Caradiodoc


Caradiodoc
Feb 21, 2011.
I am familiar with torx heads and the screw that I m dealing w/ is not. I wish it was LOL. The screw head on my rotor looks like the tip of one of a human finger if you will. It kinda of looks like a big flat head screw driver w/ the ends rounded off. And of course this description would the socket that you would put on your ratchet.I do not have any serrations at the base of each stud. I had a 86 dodge aries station wagon w/ the exact same set-up that you described.


Tiny
Hemispheres11
Feb 23, 2011.
Any chance you could post of photo?


Caradiodoc
Feb 23, 2011.
Here are the pics you requested


Tiny
Hemispheres11
Mar 2, 2011.
That's just a standard flat blade screwdriver slot. Are you familiar with hand impact drivers? That's a special screwdriver that you hit with a hammer to loosen screws. It will make the job easier.

There's no need to reinstall the screw. Its purpose was to prevent the rotor from falling off on the assembly line and hitting someone on the head.


Caradiodoc
Mar 2, 2011.
I will try to use a flat screw driver and also try to find a impact driver if I cant get it off by hand. The pics do not really show this screw head very well. The slot is round at the back of the slot.I ll give it a shot and let you know how I made out. Thanks.
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Tiny
Hemispheres11
Mar 2, 2011.

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