Mechanics

EGR VALVE REMOVAL PROBLEMS

1993 Toyota Camry • 4 cylinder Automatic • 209,000 miles

Okay, you all have been huge helps in the past.

I have a 1993 Toyota Camry 5SFE 2.2L Engine, Automatic Transmission. The car has a bad EGR Valve, or the valve just needs to be cleaned, the issue is as follows:

The top two bolts that sit on each side of the top of the EGR Valve are easy as pie to remove, but the large union nut (1")that secures the metal exhaust tube to the engine on one end, and the EGR Valve on the other, is rusted on each end and near impossible to remove.

My only option now appears to be to cut the piping, which would allow me to remove the EGR Valve. There is not enough space for even a good twist style adjustable wrench to turn either nut enough to loosen the pipe, and it doesnt help that the nuts are severely rusted.

My hope of course is that I can get away with just cleaning the EGR Valve, instead of replacing it, its an expensive fix.

My question then is:

After I cut the pipe and remove the EGR Valve, clean it and reinstall it, can I just put "heat tape" or silicon where I cut the pipe instead of replacing the entire pipe?

Its a cheap fix, but its a cheap car that just needs to make it till March at most.

Or do you have any other ideas as to how I can get these nuts removed? I even bought the heavy duty PB bolt and nut remover spray, and no luck.
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AlexandersMama2010
December 7, 2010.




What's the reason for thinking it's bad? Code output or something? Why mess with it at all? Is the car not running right? I've unplugged them or made a gasket to block completely it's function to cure leaks causing engine miss.

Tiny
Fixitmr
Dec 7, 2010.
Its a 1993, the EGR is already an issue with this make and model, I wouldnt be posting in here if I thought it was something other than the EGR Valve. No offense.

I know its an EGR Valve problem. You dont have to be an expert to know when its stalling upon acceleration/idiling, and misfiring, and you can smell the bad noxious fumes that you have a plugged EGR Valve, or a bad EGR Valve.

So going back to my question.

Tiny
AlexandersMama2010
Dec 7, 2010.
You could splice back together with a thin metal rap and tighten with hose clamp?

Tiny
Fixitmr
Dec 7, 2010.
And using homeade metal gasket to block completely? Is that available if gasket attaching surface is flat?

Tiny
Fixitmr
Dec 7, 2010.
. Thats what I am aiming for is to unplug it if its clogged with carbons, and being as this is Alaska and the car is 27 years old, it probably is clogged.

That would be another cheap fix doing what you suggested, but I am aiming to keep my fuel efficiency and have heard removing the EGR Valve entirely can be bad on your catalytic converter.

Tiny
AlexandersMama2010
Dec 7, 2010.
That sounds better than "heat tape" or silicon like I was thinking.

Tiny
AlexandersMama2010
Dec 7, 2010.
The surface is flat where I could place a homemade metal gasket
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Tiny
AlexandersMama2010
Dec 7, 2010.
So ideally, all I can really do is go buy a metal hacksaw for $7 at the local Fred Meyers store and cut it off, then splice it back together with some thin metal and a hose clamp. That would stick better than tape or silicon.

What a pain in the ass though, they placed that 1" union nut about 3-4 inches from the body of the car so even with a decent wrench for the job there is no room to make the nut turn even if it WASNT rusted on. And the other nut is under the distributor and under the oil crankcase, so its unreachable from up top and from underneath short of removing more parts.

Tiny
AlexandersMama2010
Dec 7, 2010.
How do you donate a couple more bucks on this site? I appreciate the prompt response, we cant be down without a car for long in the winter up here.

Tiny
AlexandersMama2010
Dec 7, 2010.
Last I heard you start another question to redonate. And just say thanks for the help or something.

Tiny
Fixitmr
Dec 7, 2010.

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