When moving slow and turning wheel, truck will stop moving and takes a bit to get it to drive

Tiny
JF781981
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 CHEVROLET
  • 4.3L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 330,000 MILES
Noticed today that when I am stopped and turning or even going slowly in drive or reverse, the truck wants to stop moving. I have to put the gas pedal down a little harder to get it to eventually go. My transmission fluid is full, I hear no clunking before/after/during driving. When It is running, I have no issue steering, driving or stopping. Only when moving very slow or backing up and turning the wheels. What can this be?
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Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 AT 5:33 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
This has been common on all GM rear-wheel-drive vehicles since the early '70s. At issue is a non-adjustable alignment angle called "toe-out-on-turns". It refers to the diameter of circle each front wheel is trying to make. The two don't agree so one tire has to slide across the road to keep pace with the other one. With the larger cars of the '70s, it was very noticeable when you'd back up and turn that the front end seemed to be wobbling. That was from one tire sticking to the pavement and the stress caused the sidewalls to flex. Once the point was reached where it couldn't flex anymore, the tread skidded to catch up, then it started all over.

This toe-out-on-turns isn't really an issue, and there is no way to adjust it. It just has to do with the geometry of the front suspension and steering components. Mainly that is the steering arms that are cast as part of the spindles. Toe-out-on-turns is what makes the left wheel turn further than the right one when turning left so it makes a smaller diameter circle.
The engineers just got a little carried away. There was probably some other trade-off they were after.
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Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 AT 6:27 PM
Tiny
JF781981
  • MEMBER
But this is something that has just started today? Would that make a difference? Also like I said if I am stopped and slowly moving forward and turn the wheel either way the truck stops. Even with the wheels straightened out, it takes a bit of gas to get it going again
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Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 AT 6:42 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
When it even does it when going straight, that suggests a brake is not fully releasing. There are multiple potential causes, but lets start with the easiest one first. If the parking brake was used or bumped recently, a rear cable could be rusted in the partially-applied position. Raise the tires off the ground, then try to spin which one by hand. You can also observe which wheel gets hot after driving a few miles at highway speed.
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Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 AT 6:54 PM

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