1987 Toyota Landcruiser won't pass emissions test

Tiny
BIGBERTHA3213
  • MEMBER
  • 1987 TOYOTA LANDCRUISER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • MANUAL
  • 70,340 MILES
Ok I live in houston texas and today I took my 1987 toyota landcruiser to get inspected, it passed everything except for the co test.
to pass the limit is 1.20, I failed at 1.63.
i didnt drive it for very long before I took her in, and I just bought it 2 weeks ago. Please help me find a way to lower my emissions so I can pass.
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Sunday, August 31st, 2008 AT 5:33 PM

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Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Carbon monoxide failures indicate an overly rich fuel mixture. On older carbureted engines without electronic feedback controls, look for things like a stuck choke, misadjusted or fuel saturated float or a rich idle mixture adjustment. On newer vehicles with electronic carburetors or fuel injection, the system may not be going into closed loop because of a bad coolant or oxygen sensor.

Engine and/or converter not at operating temperature. If a vehicle is only driven a short distance to the test facility, it may not be warm enough for the engine to be at normal operating temperature and/or the converter at light-off temperature. This will affect the emissions of the engine and may cause it to fail. Excessive idling while waiting in a test lane may also cause the catalytic converter and/or oxygen sensor to cool down enough where they may not control emissions properly causing higher than normal readings.
Idle speed too high. A few hundred rpm can sometimes make the difference between passing and failing an emissions test if emissions are marginal.
Dirty air filter. A restricted air filter will choke off the engines air supply, causing higher than normal CO readings.
Worn or dirty spark plugs. Excessive plug gap and fouling deposits can create ignition misfire resulting in excessive HC emissions.
Dirty oil. The oil in the crankcase can become badly contaminated with gasoline if a vehicle has been subject to a lot of short trip driving, especially during cold weather. These vapors can siphon back through the PCV system and cause elevated CO readings.
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Sunday, August 31st, 2008 AT 5:40 PM
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
  • EXPERT
Hi there,
do a full tune and check the valve clearances, you may have to re kit the carby as the power valve may me leaking.

Mark (mhpautos)
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Sunday, August 31st, 2008 AT 5:59 PM

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