New clutch now car idles rough and wont stay started

Tiny
ORBIT639
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 TOYOTA CAMRY
  • 2.2L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 118,000 MILES
I just picked up my car from the shop. I had a new clutch installed due to noticeable slippage. I jsut had them put in a new timing belt and water pump at the same shop a month ago. The car was literally running fine besides the clutch slippage before I dropped it off. Soon as I got in to drive home I noticed the rough idle. They told me I needed a tune up. I could barely make it home because soon as I took my foot off the gas the engine would die.

is this a faulty repair or do I need to do the tune up they recommended?
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Friday, December 4th, 2015 AT 3:33 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Nope. It's more likely something was left disconnected. The mechanic should have noticed the problem on the test drive. You did the proper thing by returning immediately to give the mechanic the chance to correct any mistakes. (We are only human and we do make mistakes once in a while). If your car is due for a tune-up, you might want to consider having that done, but it sounds like something more serious is causing the running problem. By serious, I mean serious to the engine's performance, not serious to repair. Visit the shop once more and explain the problem. If they refuse to look at it at no charge, go to a different shop for a diagnosis. If the fix proves to be related to the clutch job, you'll be armed with the documentation to prove it. Typically, if the first shop is reputable, they will reimburse you for the second shop's diagnostic time. If the solution will be expensive, go back to the first shop with the diagnosis from the second one.
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Friday, December 4th, 2015 AT 3:54 PM
Tiny
ORBIT639
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the reply. I put in new plugs and wires but it made no difference at all. I took it back this morning and they circle talked me and got immediately defensive.

They tried to say that the guy who test drove it before repair said it tried to die as he was pulling it in but I immediately explained that wasnt the case because it ran great when I dropped it off.

Besides that the guy called me after his test drive and explained that my clutch was going out. Now im no mechanic, but if I did a test drive and I couldnt go a block without the car dying and running like there was a vacuum leak then I would have told the customer there was something wrong.

I brought it back this morning and pointed out that the part that goes from the intake manifold to the flex tube isnt connected properly and exhaust was coming out (there is a several millimeter gap that is clearly visable). They told me that it was prob burning off some of the sealant.

The guy then turned up my idle so it wouldn't die and I made it to work. When I got home I could smell something so I opened the hood. The lower part of the exhaust manifold was literally glowing red. Im sure this is causing at least part of the problem, correct?
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Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 7:08 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I'd want to see it to be sure, but if you're describing what I think you are, you found the cause of the problem. You said "intake manifold", but if you mean the throttle body, which is bolted to the intake manifold, that fresh air tube connecting it to the mass air flow sensor absolutely can not have any leaks. Any air that sneaks into the engine without going through that sensor won't get measured, so the proper amount of fuel to goo with it won't be calculated. The engine will run excessively lean with reduced power.

I suppose your engine might have something that can raise the idle speed, but that is controlled by the Engine Computer and there are no adjustments needed. Every car I've seen does not have a mechanical adjustment. I suspect you have a misfire condition that is reducing engine power and idle speed. That misfire is what needs to be addressed. The red-hot exhaust manifold tells me the misfire is spark-related and the unburned fuel is burning in the manifold instead of in the cylinder.
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Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 8:04 PM

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