2000 Mitsubishi Galant shuddering at highway speeds?

Tiny
A.RINGHISER
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 MITSUBISHI GALANT
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 124,000 MILES
Story: I was driving my Galant on the highway today and I noticed that when I needed to slow down slightly, as I was coming up behind a car, that the car would "jump / jerk" when I removed pressure to the accelerator. I have experienced this problem before, but this has been the first time I have noticed it in a while, you know how that goes *haha* I was actually wondering if this has something to do with the transaxle, suspension or the engine because I need to make sure it is nothing too big. The problem occurs between the 70-80 mph range, but not between 0-50 or 80-100. Strange? Let me know what it could be, and what I will need to do to have it stop doing this. Pretty sure this isn't a thing a "normal" car would do! I have the following hunches on what it could be:

bad transaxle solenoid or something to do with overdrive?

misfire?

torque converter issues?

old fluid in the transmission?

failing computer causing major gear hunting?

ideas!

Thanks in advance for a great answer ;D

~Alec
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 10:24 PM

9 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Hi Alec,

Thank you for the donation.

Any problem that is consistent only with road speed can be narrowed down to the following.

1. Drive axles components.
2. Road wheel.

For other listed hunches, they would occur at any given road speed.

I would suggest checking the drive axle CV inner joints for wear and lack of lubricants.
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 10:49 PM
Tiny
A.RINGHISER
  • MEMBER
Could that mean that the CV joints are worn, or the boots cracked? I have also read that it could just be the wheels not being balanced.

It only shudders / jerks when I take my foot off the gas, it will drive at 75 just fine with the brake OR gas petal pressed, but as soon as you take your foot off *BAM* it starts to shake. Thats why I am thinking it is a transaxle issue.

Any insight to these new details I forgot to put in the first time? (Sorry about that)

Alec

*correction: it is a car, not a flower :) its called a PEDAL not a PETAL! My bad!
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 10:53 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Yes, it could mean worn CV joints due to broken or insecurely fastened boots spilling out the lubricants over time.

If problem is due to improperly balanced wheels, the problem would occur with or without accelerator pressure.

Since problem occurs only when accelerator pressure is released, it would be linked to the axles and steering linkages. Worn steering linkages would also result in vibrations, shimmy etc and it could be that the problem is not very noticeable at speeds higher or lower than specified.

It could be more than one component that is bad and when both adds up, the problem becomes aggravated.
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 11:08 PM
Tiny
A.RINGHISER
  • MEMBER
I just got quoted from my repair shop (not thinking it would be involved, but I guess it is now) that I had a loose tie-rod or something steering related that messed up my alignment. This combined with "worn" shocks could contribute to the issue? Let me know, and thanks so much for your other answers!

Alec
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 11:12 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Yes, the loose tie-rod end would contribute to such problems. Wheel alignment would be out and the tires would wear unevenly over time.

The shocks/struts would not be directly related to this problem.
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 11:20 PM
Tiny
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Thanks so much! So just to get this straight: the tie-rod would have become loose due to the last alignment being done incorrectly? Or does this kind of thing happen from time to time?

Also:

a clicking sound that comes from around the drive belt area is most likely a belt tensioner, correct? Any way to diagnose this?

Let me know!

Thanks!

Alec
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Saturday, October 16th, 2010 AT 11:48 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Most likely the tie-rod end ball joint is worn resulting in excessive clearance and movement.

Clicking noise are seldom tensioner problems, more likely to be belt condition. Only way to check is visual inspection of the belts. Try splashing some water onto the belts and see if the noise changes.
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Sunday, October 17th, 2010 AT 12:13 AM
Tiny
A.RINGHISER
  • MEMBER
Ok, I will try that. Would a worn belt also squeal while the engine is warming up, but once warmed not squeal anymore? Are the belts easy to change by yourself? I can change oil and do all that "cool" stuff, so would it just be something I can run to the auto parts store and pop on in like a half-hour? Let me know what I would need to do that myself, or if it is better to pay someone to do it. Thanks!

Alec
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Sunday, October 17th, 2010 AT 1:24 AM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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A loose or worn belt would squeal while accelerating or warming up and might stop arfter warming up.

Replacement of the drive belts should not be a problem for you and can be completed under an hour.

Check the condition and mybe an adjustment is all it needs.
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Sunday, October 17th, 2010 AT 5:03 AM

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