1979 Other Lincoln Models car seems to have short but cant l

Tiny
ROBERTDUDLEY
  • MEMBER
  • 1979 LINCOLN
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 95,000 MILES
I have a 1979 Lincoln Versailles. We replaced the alternator about 6 months back. Now recently we replaced the cable running from the alternator to the cellunoid positive. It is a fusible link that was causing the battery not to be recharged and the ALT light came on. Now our old battery(which we had tested, they claim it was good) was draining if we left the Positive terminal on the battery. We did the test with a light meter on the negative and pulled the fuses under the dash one by one to isolate the short, but none turned the light off(indicating the path of the short). Then it seemed our battery was swelling and bleeding and directly after driving you could actually hear the positive terminal sizzling. So we replaced the battery and battery cables. Now the battery has again drained after a night or two. Is there a way the cable we replaced could somehow be overchargind the battery while driving and draining it at night? If the short is pre fuse box what options do I have past the cellunoid?
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Wednesday, July 15th, 2009 AT 1:09 PM

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Tiny
BUDDYCRAIGG
  • EXPERT
Sounds like an alternator problem. Likely with the diode trio.

Be careful around over charge and swelling batteries. They could explode and spray acid all over you.
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Wednesday, July 15th, 2009 AT 7:21 PM
Tiny
ROBERTDUDLEY
  • MEMBER
If it is the diode trio on the alternator, wouldn't that give a fail on the alternator test machine. We have had it tested in and out of the car and they claim it is good. It is less than 6 months old. Could the fusible link we replaced from the alternator to the cellunoid be hooked up incorrectly somehow. Or would it not even start if that is the case. Thanks for any info.
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Thursday, July 16th, 2009 AT 12:25 PM
Tiny
BUDDYCRAIGG
  • EXPERT
In my best Homer Simpson voice, DOH!
I meant the regulator.
The regulator commands how much power the alternator makes, by controlling how much electricity goes to the field coils. If it's shorted then the field coils have power all the time, even when the engine is off and thus draining the battery.
It would also be making the alternator produce the maximum amount of power that it can, and over charging the battery.

The test you did with the light, do that again, but this time disconnect the alternator. Being careful not to bump the charging wire against anything metal.

You probably have the fuseable link in the correct place, as you said, it wouldn't start.
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Thursday, July 16th, 2009 AT 12:41 PM

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