Radiator leak rescue?

Tiny
JEFF023
  • MEMBER
  • JEEP CHEROKEE
Hi All--

Took my 1996 Jeep Cherokee(4litre engine 75K miles) to the mechanic (I have a good relationship to him going back about six years), to see about a transmission noise. He didn't totally locate the noise, but he did find a leak in the radiator. It's a split seam. $550 for a new radiator, but I'm wondering if I can just put some Bars leak or a similar product in there.

Will Bars leak work on a seam split? (At least until I can rake up $550 for a new radiator? Any advice / thoughts appreciated.
A thought: I am reasonably handy with tools (I restore old gasoline engines for a hobby). Is it possible I could get a radiator and hoses and install them myself?

Thanks,

Jeff
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Monday, January 22nd, 2007 AT 10:21 AM

7 Replies

Tiny
CARUNDELL
  • MEMBER
Hey Jeff,
If you need to save your pennies to get it repaired then by all means some radiator stop leak may be the way to go. Its a crap shoot though. As in it may or may not work.
That radiator is not too difficult to change yourself, just take your time and let us know if ya get stuck or need assistance!

Chris
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Monday, January 22nd, 2007 AT 10:53 AM
Tiny
CHARLES ANDERSON
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Hello, My son has a 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 2wheel drive, 6 cylinder. The engine started running hot and I noticed the water pump was chirping, so I replaced the water pump and thermostat. I refilled the water reservior with antifreeze and water and went on my merry way. Later that evening my son returned and stated that his car was running hot and the water pump was again chirping.

I obtained another pump and replaced the one I had installed, (plus installed a new thermostat) earlier. Upon removal, I noticed that no water flowed out (from within the block) from behind the pump, also when I removed the lower radiator hose from the pump, there was no water in the hose.

At engine operating temp, I removed the cap from the radatior and the water was not hot and was not under pressure. I seem to be getting no water circulation through the engine block. Do I have to bleed the air out of the block somehow, or could it be a valve or something else? This is the 2nd. Pump I've installed. Help!
Thanks,
I have donated!
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Monday, January 29th, 2007 AT 10:24 AM
Tiny
CHARLES ANDERSON
  • MEMBER
If it's not too late, I recommend you remove the radiator yourself and save the labor cost. It not too tough once you remove the fan/clutch assembly. Pull the rediator and take it to a radatior repair shop. They can solder and test, flush, etc. At a reasonable price.

Hey Jeff,
If you need to save your pennies to get it repaired then by all means some radiator stop leak may be the way to go. Its a crap shoot though. As in it may or may not work.
That radiator is not too difficult to change yourself, just take your time and let us know if ya get stuck or need assistance!

Chris[/quote:edba8826fd]
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Monday, January 29th, 2007 AT 1:16 PM
Tiny
JEFF023
  • MEMBER
Thanks to all for the helpful suggestions. Charles, I especially like your idea. I'm going to try it, and I'll post when I get it done. Thing is, I've been checking the coolant level frequestly since this all started, and it really isn't losing any liquid. Shouldn't there be a spot on the driveway, if nothing else?

Maybe the bar's leak is working. When I get it into my garage I'm going to try to find the leak--the mechanic said it was underneath on the right front. I'd hate to think this guy would lie to me--I've had work done there for the past six or seven years. I have to say, though, the day they were looking at it, there was a mechanic on duty but no cars in the shop, and the employee seemed to be doing cleanup. Sigh. Guess I'll never know until I pull the radiator out.

Thanks again to all:-)
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Monday, January 29th, 2007 AT 1:58 PM
Tiny
CARUNDELL
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Thats certainly an option, just make sure that its cost effective for the radiator repair shop to fix it vice buying a new one. Some homework would be in order

Chris
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Monday, January 29th, 2007 AT 2:11 PM
Tiny
JEEPSKURFER
  • MEMBER
To OP. Jeff I've got some words of encouragement for you. Last summer (I live in Orlando which we've affectionately named the Furnace) my radiator blew, my hoses ruptured, and my temp senser burnt out all at once.

A new OEM radiator costs roughly $125 (I didn't have time to shop around; you may have time to look for a lower price), about $20 in hoses, and I beleive another $20 for the new thermometer. All parts were bought at Discount Auto.

After about four hours of banging heads with my pops tearing down the old coolant system and replacing it I had a new system which hasn't failed me yet even under the stress of frequent off-road use. We even gave it an amateur flush with a hose to get most of the debris from the heater core.

Doing it yourself is very feasible and from your estimate. Saves you around 400 bucks.

Just be methodical and remember how everything went together.
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Tuesday, January 30th, 2007 AT 9:17 AM
Tiny
CARUNDELL
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Good sound advice! (Hey I need a Jr. Tech! You interested? LOL kidding!) Great advice on the methodical work practice! It never fails me!

Chris
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Tuesday, January 30th, 2007 AT 7:03 PM

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