1999 Jeep Cherokee steering wheel Vibration

Tiny
STUART1257
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 110,000 MILES
I have a jeep grand cherokee V8 Auto that I have a vibration through the steering wheel between 35 - 45 mph above above 50 mph it seems to disapear, can any one help
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Thursday, October 9th, 2008 AT 2:52 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Assuming by vibration you mean shimmy. First thought is you have a tire out of round or tread creep. Or, it may be a front drive axle joint trying to bind up.
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Thursday, October 9th, 2008 AT 5:10 PM
Tiny
STUART1257
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the reply but I have new tyres fitted and balanced.
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Saturday, October 11th, 2008 AT 4:44 PM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Question off the top of my head. Did you have this wobble before you put the new tires on. I sold brand name tires out of my shop and on a "very rare" occasion I would have one go bad within a month or two.
ASSUMING, your Cherokee is 4whl drive, I'm still curious about front axle joints.
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Saturday, October 11th, 2008 AT 6:19 PM
Tiny
STUART1257
  • MEMBER
Thanks again for the reply,
just found out the front cv boots have been changed these had been split for some time be fore sale. Is there an easy way to find out if the joints are at fault or do I just have to change them

thanks stuart
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Sunday, October 12th, 2008 AT 5:37 AM
Tiny
MERLIN2021
  • EXPERT
Check also the track bar, this runs from the front axle to the frame just under the radiator, and the ball end at the radiator is the weak point.
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Sunday, October 12th, 2008 AT 8:04 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Stuart, you're hot on the trail! There are 2 joints on each shaft. The inboard joints rarely go bad 'cause they don't flex as much as the outboard. Outboard joints flex more due to steering.
To check: With the vehicle in park, lift one wheel at a time off the ground. Turn the wheel back and forth by hand while watching the drive axle shaft. If there is "any" delay or "flop" between the movement of the wheel and the axle shaft, the joint is bad. You do the same test to check the inboard joint but, like I said, the inboards rarely go bad unless the vehicle has seen a lot of heavy 4-wheeling. There are "rebuild" kits available but they can be difficult to install. Rebuilt shafts are the most popular because they come both new joints. Any good parts store will have a listing for them. You can replace the axles your self but it takes some special tools. Hope this helps.
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Sunday, October 12th, 2008 AT 2:01 PM

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