1997 Honda Civic Blowing AC Condensor Fan Fuse

Tiny
OZZYFLASH
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 HONDA CIVIC
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 140,000 MILES
The AC Condensor Fan Fuse continually blows. If I replace the fuse while the engine is cooled down the AC will run and cool the car for 5 minutes or so while at idle. Once the engine warms up the fuse blows causing the condensor fan to quit and compressor clutch to disengage. If I replace the fuse while the car is at running temp the fuse will blow immediately upon hitting the AC power button. It does not appear to be a wire shorting out to ground as the fuse only blows when the car is at running temp. The AC will run with a fresh fuse and cold engine. Is it possible for the compressor clutch or condensor fan to short across the coils at higher temperatures to create an increased current draw? Is there something that I'm over looking completely?
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Friday, September 5th, 2008 AT 9:42 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Hi ozzyflash,

Either the fan motor or clutch coil is shorting, disconnect either one to test which is the cause.
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Monday, September 8th, 2008 AT 10:50 AM
Tiny
OZZYFLASH
  • MEMBER
So that others may benefit from this thread. I disconnected the ground ( black wire atop the compressor) from the compressor clutch and idled the car with the AC switch ON. The fuse did not blow and thus singled out the coil in the AC Compressor clutch as the source of the problem. There is also a connection near the condensor fan that can be disconnected to test out the fan.

Additionally, the coil can not be purchased on its own. A Condensor clutch kit can be purchased for about $99 (found mine at advance auto parts). It is possible to swap out the clutch while the condensor is on the car, but it will require pulling 3 of the mounting bolts out and pivoting the condensor on the 4th bolt so that it can be angled downwards to pull the pulley off (frame rail is in the way otherwise). The benefit of doing it on the car is that the freon does not have to be evacuated and refilled. Thanks for the help here.
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Monday, September 8th, 2008 AT 8:59 PM
Tiny
OZZYFLASH
  • MEMBER
In the previous post I mentioned that the compressor clutch coil could be replaced on the car. That is correct. I misused the term condensor for compressor. The coil can be replaced with the compressor on the car if 3 of the 4 bolts are removed and the compressor is allowed to pivot (pulley side down). This allows room to pull the pulley off the shaft and expose the coil. Without doing this the frame rail prevents the removal of the pulley/coil.
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Sunday, September 21st, 2008 AT 7:44 PM

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