Carbon build up

Tiny
SYNCRAIT
  • MEMBER
  • GMC
What is the best thing to use to clean up the carbon build up on the piston heads and the head itself
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 9:46 AM

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Tiny
LOSONE
  • MEMBER
For us to be able to assist you, it is absolutely necessary for you to include the make, model, year and mileage of your car and tranny.

With modern fuels and automotive computer systems there is very little carbon build up unless you have 200K plus on the engine. NOT a good idea to remove it.

If you must, have a professional fuel injector cleaning and that will remove all that is needed.
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 1:13 PM
Tiny
SYNCRAIT
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Its a 1994 S-10 139k and so far I just have been using brake cleaner and a clean towel and have gotten enough off to satisfy, is doing this going to screw up the compression or something horrible?
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 1:54 PM
Tiny
LOSONE
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Anytime you add something to the engine combustion thats no supposed to be there causes O2 sensor problems. Good luck
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 2:25 PM
Tiny
SYNCRAIT
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I havent added anything I have the head off the engine and im removing the carbon. Or are you talking a bout the remnants it may leave behind
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 2:47 PM
Tiny
CAVALIER
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I think he means any brake cleaner that might be left behind. Including the fumes.
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 3:12 PM
Tiny
LOSONE
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Sorry, I misunderstood. The rule of thumb is to dry clean and scrape carbon for the piston tops. You don't want any liquid that may dissolve carbon and let it get on your compression rings and cylinder walls. If you have--try and clean the cylinders with a clean soft cloth.

Cleaning heads you can use anything that works as long as it is clean when you are ready to assemble the engine. In machine shops they remove the valves and vat boil the head.

If the head is aluminum, be very careful not to scratch the machined surface or use sand paper as you might damage the block contact surface.

Are you doing a valve job or just replacing a head gasket? Good luck
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 5:03 PM
Tiny
SYNCRAIT
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Not sure whats your suggestion. Im getting the head machined. Do I need to take the valves out for him to do so. Yes it is an alunimum head.
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 5:08 PM
Tiny
LOSONE
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Not unless you feel you have a valve problem. They can surface the head without touching the valves. You are doing the right thing getting the head machined. They often warp especially if you had a head gasket issue
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 5:31 PM
Tiny
SYNCRAIT
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Well I do have a question. On one of the valves there seems to be excessive buildup if I have them clean that one up am I just better off getting them all done, or am I just looking for trouble trying to take it all apart.
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 5:33 PM
Tiny
LOSONE
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You can let them do a valve job. That will replece your valve guide seals which are prone to go bad after an over heating event. It's a good time to do it so the head will be worry free. Ask them to also check for cracks.
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Friday, May 12th, 2006 AT 6:12 PM

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