Front passenger side noisy between 40 to 60 mph

Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
  • 2009 HONDA ACCORD
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 102,500 MILES
After new tire replacement and wheel alignment service front passenger side sounding noisy when accelerating between 40 to 60 mile per hour.
What is possible reason for the noisy created?
Thanks for your directions and instructions!
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Friday, June 28th, 2019 AT 6:56 AM

5 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome to 2CarPros.

Can you describe the noise you hear? Is it a howling sound? Does it change when turning?
Is it a clunk? Does it change when you use the brakes?

If it is a howling sound that changes, chances are it is a wheel bearing issue. You may not have noticed it prior to the new tires, but not it stands out.

If you notice it gets louder when turning left, then suspect the right (passenger side) wheel bearing. Here are directions for replacement if that is what you notice. However, let me know the answers to my questions first. The attached pictures correlate with the directions.

________________________

FRONT KNUCKLE/HUB/WHEEL BEARING REPLACEMENT
Front Knuckle/Hub/Wheel Bearing Replacement

Exploded View

pic 1

Special Tools Required
- Ball joint remover, 28 mm 07MAC-SL0A202
- Hub dis/assembly tool 07GAF-SD40100
- Bearing driver attachment, 72 x 75 mm 07746-0010600
- Driver handle 07749-0010000
- Bearing driver attachment, 78 x 90 mm 07GAD-SD40101
- Support base 07965-SD90100

Knuckle/Hub Replacement

1. Raise the front of the vehicle, and support it with safety stands in the proper locations. See: Vehicle Lifting > Procedures

2. Remove the wheel nuts and the front wheel.

Pic 2

3. Remove the brake hose bracket mounting bolt (A).

4. Remove the brake caliper bracket mounting bolts (B), then remove the caliper assembly (C) from the knuckle. To prevent damage to the caliper assembly or the brake hose, use a short piece of wire to hang the caliper assembly from the undercarriage. Do not twist the brake hose excessively.

Pic 3

5. Remove the wheel speed sensor harness bracket (A) and the wheel speed sensor (B) from the knuckle. Do not disconnect the wheel speed sensor connector.

Pic 4

6. Raise the stake (A), then remove the spindle nut (B).

7. Remove the front brake disc. See: Brake Rotor/Disc > Removal and Replacement > Front Brake Disc Replacement

8. Check the front hub for damage and cracks.

Pic 5

9. Remove the cotter pin (A) from the tie-rod end ball joint, then remove the nut (B).
NOTE: During installation, install the new cotter pin after tightening the nut, and bend its end as shown.

10. Disconnect the tie-rod end ball joint from the knuckle using the ball joint thread protector and the ball joint remover. See: Ball Joint > Removal and Replacement > Ball Joint Removal

pic 6

11. Remove the cotter pin (A) from the knuckle ball joint, then remove the castle nut (B).
NOTE: During installation, insert the new cotter pin into the ball joint pin hole from the front to the rear of the vehicle, and bend its end as shown. Check the ball joint pin hole direction before connecting the ball joint.

12. Disconnect the knuckle ball joint from the lower arm using the ball joint remover. See: Ball Joint > Removal and Replacement > Ball Joint Removal
NOTE:

- Be careful not to damage the ball joint boot when installing the remover.

- Do not force or hammer on the lower arm, or pry between the lower arm and the knuckle. You could damage the ball joint.

Pic 7

13. Remove the cotter pin (A) from the upper arm ball joint, then remove the castle nut (B).
NOTE: During installation, insert the new cotter pin into the ball joint pin hole from the front to the rear of the vehicle, and bend its end as shown. Check the ball joint pin hole direction before connecting the ball joint.

14. Disconnect the upper arm ball joint from the knuckle using the ball joint remover. See: Ball Joint > Removal and Replacement > Ball Joint Removal

pic 8

15. Remove the driveshaft outboard joint (A) from the knuckle (B) by tapping the driveshaft end (C) with a soft face hammer while drawing the hub outward, then remove the knuckle/hub.
NOTE:

- Do not pull the driveshaft end outward. The driveshaft inboard joint may come apart.

- During installation, apply grease to the mating surfaces of the wheel bearing and the driveshaft outboard joint. See: Axle Shaft Assembly > Removal and Replacement > Driveshaft Installation

16. Install the knuckle/hub in the reverse order of removal, and note these items:
- First install all of the components, and lightly tighten the bolts and the nuts, then raise the suspension to load it with the vehicle's weight before fully tightening to the specified torque values. Do not place the jack against the ball joint pin of the knuckle.

- Be careful not to damage the ball joint boot when connecting the knuckle.

- Before connecting the ball joint, degrease the threaded section and the tapered portion of the ball joint pin, the ball joint connecting hole, and the threaded section and the mating surfaces of the castle nut.

- Torque the castle nut to the lower torque specification, then tighten it only far enough to align the slot with the ball joint pin hole. Do not align the castle nut by loosening it.

- Use a new spindle nut on reassembly.

- Before installing the spindle nut, apply a small amount of engine oil to the seating surface of the nut. After tightening, use a drift to stake the spindle nut shoulder against the driveshaft.

- Before installing the brake disc, clean the mating surfaces of the front hub and the inside of the brake disc.

- Before installing the wheel, clean the mating surfaces of the brake disc and the inside of the wheel.

17. Check the wheel alignment, and adjust it if necessary. See: Alignment > Procedures

pic 9

Wheel Bearing Replacement

1. Separate the hub (A) from the knuckle (B) using the hub dis/assembly tool and a hydraulic press. Hold the knuckle with the attachment (C) of the hydraulic press or equivalent tool. Be careful not to damage or deform the splash guard (D). Hold onto the hub to keep it from falling when pressed clear.

Pic 10

2. Press the wheel bearing inner race (A) off of the hub (B) using the hub dis/assembly tool, a commercially available bearing separator (C), and a press.

Pic 11

3. Remove the snap ring (A) and the splash guard (B) from the knuckle (C).

Pic 12

4. Press the wheel bearing (A) out of the knuckle (B) using the bearing driver attachment, the driver handle, and a press.

5. Wash the knuckle and the hub thoroughly in high flash point solvent before reassembly.

Pic 13

6. Press a new wheel bearing (A) into the knuckle (B) using the old bearing (C), a steel plate (D), the bearing driver attachment, the support base, and a press.
NOTE:

- Install the wheel bearing with the wheel speed sensor magnetic encoder (E) (brown color), toward the inside of the knuckle.

- Remove any oil, grease, dust, metal debris, and other foreign material from the encoder surface.

- Keep any magnetic tools away from the encoder surface.

- Be careful not to damage the encoder surface when you insert the wheel bearing.

Pic 14

7. Check the front knuckle ring (A) for damage or deformation, and replace it if necessary.
NOTE: When installing the new front knuckle ring, position the knuckle ring notch portion (B) toward cut out (C) near the ball joint in the knuckle, and align the center of the knuckle ring ledge portion (D) with the center of the wheel sensor hole (E) on the knuckle as shown.

Pic 15

8. Install the snap ring (A) securely in the knuckle (B).

9. Install the splash guard (C), and tighten the screws (D) to the specified torque value.

Pic 16

10. Install the hub (A) onto the knuckle (B) using the bearing driver attachment, the driver handle, the support base, and a hydraulic press. Be careful not to damage the splash guard (C).

Pic 17

_____________________________

Let me know if this helps and the answers to the aforementioned questions.

Take care,
Joe
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Friday, June 28th, 2019 AT 9:08 PM
Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
Thanks a lot for your instruction and help! It is beyond my ability to do so many mechanic works by myself. The dealer just told me Need to replacement front right wheel bearing today with cost $540 while he did not claim the issue on the first time wheel alignment. Just after one week they state that I need to replace the bearing. It just happened in a week. While it did not happen during past 10 years. And same dealer did wheel alignment every two year. While Chevrolet cars with out wheel alignment can run 200,000 miles. Is it normal case to do wheel alignment pay for $135.00 every two years?
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Tuesday, July 2nd, 2019 AT 11:16 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome back:

The only time I align my vehicle is when a component is replaced which demands realignment. For example, a tie rod end, struts, or anything that would require me to remove and replace something related to doing the alignment. Most times, I measure lengths of tie rods and just put the new one back on to that length and have never had a problem. The only other time I will align my vehicle is if I notice a tire wear issue that is indicating it needs done. I purchased a Durango in 2013 new, and it has 80,000 on it and nothing has ever been done. The tires were perfectly straight.

With all of that, other than preventative maintenance, I don't see a need for an alignment unless one of the criteria I mentioned is met.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Take care and happy 4th!

Joe
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Tuesday, July 2nd, 2019 AT 6:38 PM
Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
Thank you so much for your help and instruction!
The noisy sounds like wind blowing voice. Front two tires were filled by 35 PSI air while rear tires filled 30PSI by service after tire alignment. After adjust to 30PSI the noisy decreased but still making noisy over 40 mph acceleration. If there may be additional cause of noisy sound except bearing problem?
Thanks for your help and instruction!
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Friday, July 12th, 2019 AT 7:39 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome back:

If the noise decreased, are you sure it isn't tire design? Cupped tires will do it. But since the tires are new, they should be fine. Unless, they are of an aggressive design. Can you upload a picture of the tire tread?

Joe
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Friday, July 12th, 2019 AT 6:52 PM

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