Sensors

Tiny
JSMITH5532
  • MEMBER
  • FORD EXPLORER
We have a 1998 Ford Explorer. It probably has about 100,000 miles on it. I'm not sure if it's a six or eight cylinder.

My question concerns the sensors. It recently failed inspection because the sensors were bad. We had them replaced and the inspector said the sensors weren't reading yet or ready yet. A couple people have told us that we had to put on a certain number of miles and keep driving the car until the sensors would read and be ready.

No one knows how many miles we have to put on the car but they all say we have to drive it. We're a bit concerned because it's failed inspection and we're hesitant to drive too much? Help!
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Monday, May 14th, 2007 AT 8:36 AM

4 Replies

Tiny
MARKS43
  • MEMBER
I had this happen to 99 ford expl. I had to put
15 miles on it.
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Monday, May 14th, 2007 AT 6:12 PM
Tiny
JSMITH5532
  • MEMBER
We've driven well past 15 miles! I know we put on at least 100. I don't know what to do. I found information saying to drive it at certain speeds for certain periods of time and all that. It seems like nothing works.
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Tuesday, May 15th, 2007 AT 7:18 AM
Tiny
WESMAN2440
  • MEMBER
Are these oxygen sensors were talkin about?
If so there not put in right
find them and jig with them a little bit and when I say jig I mean play with them and see what happens

The mileage for anything to reset is 50 miles just to let you know. That is so the on board computer can reset and read the new systems. :D
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Wednesday, May 16th, 2007 AT 6:29 PM
Tiny
TAURUSWHEEL
  • MEMBER
Is the check engine light on? What you need to do is called a "drive cycle", well maybe not, everyday driving around town and the highway will accomplish the same thing. What happens when you reset the check engine light to off is that all the monitors reset also to "not ready status". It's all due to the emission laws, what this does is prevent you from turning off the check engine light and taking the car for emissions testing, it will not pass if any monitors have not run, the monitors check the various components of the emission controls to make sure they are performing their respective functions, most vehicles have I think from 6 to 11 different ones depending on vehicle. The "drive cycle" I mentioned above is a manufacturer-specific set of circumstances that will cause the monitors to run. Some monitors run every warm-up cycle, some are continuously running. They must all show"done" in order to qualify for emissions testing success.
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Wednesday, May 16th, 2007 AT 8:03 PM

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