1998 Ford Expedition coolant

Tiny
AZHALE
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 FORD EXPEDITION
  • 4 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
What type of coolant do I add. Can I just use water?Pennzoil antifreeze. Also, can I repair the cd player myself. The songs keep on skipping. Thanks.
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Sunday, May 4th, 2008 AT 3:19 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
Doesnt matter the kind of antifreeze, wal*mart special, gm, ford, penzoil. Just be sure if you get concentrated mix one jug of water in with it.

If its 50 50 premix then just add the jug and nothing else.

If it doesnt get bellow freezing at the time of the year untill fall or winter, you can run water, it will cool even better then antifreeze.
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Sunday, May 4th, 2008 AT 5:53 PM
Tiny
JAMES STAPLES
  • MEMBER
My issue is different. I have a 1998 Expedition where I have changed the water pump, thermostat and flushed the radiator. I them installed a radiator temp sensor. My temperature needle goes all the way to the red and then goes down. It may do this a couple of times them it stays in the proper operating setting. What causes these ups and downs?
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Friday, December 30th, 2016 AT 1:59 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Do not run straight water. It's true it holds more BTUs of heat which can add to its efficiency in moving heat to the radiator, but antifreeze does that just fine too. More importantly, antifreeze has critical additives including water pump lubricant, and corrosion inhibitors. Coolant is going to become acidic over time. The corrosion inhibitors wear out in about two years. Coolant must replaced at scheduled intervals to replenish those additives. Ask any GM owner about corroded and leaking heater cores and radiators. Those use the red Dex-Cool, (Dex-Mud) antifreeze. To make their cost of regular maintenance falsely appear lower than that of their competitors, GM listed it as "lifetime" coolant, then, once you bought the vehicle, on the reservoirs, they said to replace it every three years. Even the Dex-Cool company doesn't recommend that. Many owners only remember that "lifetime" claim and end up with repeated leaking parts.

By the early 2000s, most manufacturers were using antifreeze formulations designed specifically to meet the needs of their engines. Some replacement antifreeze can be used in multiple applications, but it may not be suitable for every engine. If you're just adding a little, such as after replacing a thermostat, always add the same formulation that is in there now. The detergents in some brands may not be compatible with the seal conditioners in other bands. Mixing two types might lead to a leaking water pump seal. If you're doing a flush and refill, you can use any brand that says it is compatible with the needs of your engine. Those "needs" mainly refer to the different types of metals that must be protected, and the composition of the rubber hoses. Some additives will accelerate the deterioration of some rubber hoses.

The skipping CD can have multiple causes. Obviously try a different CD first. That will show if scratches are the cause. Next, you can try running a cleaning CD, but only use one that includes a small bottle of cleaner. One drop is placed onto one of the brushes. If you have the CD / cassette combo radio, the laser lens can be cleaned with a cotton swab after removing the top cover. If you have the six-disc in-dash changer, don't waste your time trying to get it apart. Those are a disaster.

If the skipping occurs mainly in cold weather, the best suspect is the grease on the laser sled's guide rails has become hardened. The mechanism needs to be removed and disassembled to clean that grease off, then the rails are re-lubricated with new grease. The clue to this is the skipping will stop for a while right after bouncing over a pot hole. That jars the sled and lets it move ahead and catch up to the laser that is straining to move far enough to see the tracks. When the sled pops free, it usually bounces ahead up to 30 seconds on the track. The grease problem also tends to cause more trouble when the laser sled is at either end of its travel, meaning the beginning or end of the CD. If it sticks near the center of the disc, it won't get far enough to read the table of contents, and it won't start to play without reading that information.
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Friday, December 30th, 2016 AT 5:07 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
James, you need to start a new post for your problem. Unlike on other sites where anyone and everyone can weigh in, here, you're piggybacking on a question that is a conversation between the people who replied so far, and no one else. That means none of the other experts will ever see your question or have a chance to reply. That does you a disservice. I also don't know which engine you have, the mileage, and other important details. When you start a new question, it will be more relevant to other people researching a similar problem.

In this case, however, you lucked out and got a genius like me! If you look at your old thermostat, more than likely you will see a tiny bleed hole with a dangle hanging in it, right in the middle of the center plate. If the new one doesn't have that, you can drill a 1/16" hole in the plate. You can also pry the plate open, then put a very small dent in the edge. The goal is to prevent it from sealing perfectly.

What is happening is the heat is being generated "over here" in the engine, and that's where the coolant temperature sensor for the dash gauge sits. The thermostat is "over there" where the coolant is still cold, so it doesn't open, ... Yet. The thermostat opens once the heat migrates over to it, but by that time the gauge has gone much higher than normal. When the thermostat opens, coolant starts to circulate, and the cold coolant in the radiator rushes into the engine. That makes the gauge go down a lot. At that point the same thing starts all over. By the time this happens three to five times, the system stabilizes and works normally.

The bleed hole in the thermostat allows the hot coolant to work its way over to the thermostat sooner. Bigger is not better. Don't get carried away with the size of the hole because that is not going to solve this problem better. It will cause the coolant to never get hot enough. That will adversely affect emissions and the temperature of the heated air from the heater. It can also prevent the fuel system from going into "closed loop" which improves fuel mileage.
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Friday, December 30th, 2016 AT 5:28 PM

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