1997 Rough Take-offs

Tiny
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  • 1997 FORD ESCORT
I'm driving a 1997 Ford Escort, with about 55,000 miles (Rebuilt Engine, 2.0L Inline 4). The problem started about two months ago. Whenever I'd be stopped, or off the throttle, coasting slowly, I would get back into the gas, and the car would start shuttering really bad, and attempt to die. The only way to get it to move would be to put the petal to the metal. This kept it from dieing, and was the only way to gain any sort of speed, because the power just went away completely. The shuttering would only last a second or two, and then disappear. My "Service Engine Soon" light came on, and I immediately took it to the nearest Autozone. I had them run a diagnostic, and it told me my Cylinder 4 was misfiring. So, naturally, I replaced the spark plugs, and continued driving it. It would be fine for a week or so, and then start the problem once more. After that, I changed the spark plug wires, and continued driving. Once again, a week or so went by before any problems. At this point, I changed the Ignition Coil. It ran GREAT for about two days before it persisted. Finally, getting fed up with it, I dropped it off at a local shop. The mechanic put about 40 miles on it, without any problem, so he decided to replace the fuel filter, thinking it might be clogged (the only reason I agreed to it was because it needed to be done anyway). So, after the mechanic replaced the Fuel Filter and Oil Switch (which was leaking), I took it out for a spin. At that point, it died, completely. I parked it, and tried to start it. Nothing. The Engine was making very sad attempts at turning over, and when I could get it started, it sounded like only one of my cylinders (Probably cylinder 4) wasn't firing at all, and it made a horrible clicking noise. I had it towed to a different shop, and it's sitting there, now. So, I was just wondering if you guys had any ideas that I could pass on to those mechanics? Thanks for any help you can give me!
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Sunday, November 4th, 2007 AT 12:32 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
SYST3M_FA1LUR_33
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I have very similar problems with the car wanting to stall and have to floor the pedal to keep the car from stalling and also have plugs mis firing. So please if you get in information on it pass the word on to me. Thanks.
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Tuesday, November 20th, 2007 AT 8:09 AM
Tiny
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Well, unfortunately, I never did solve the problem because my engine quit working about a week after posting the problem. I ended up dropping the piston that was misfiring, which means that I have to get a new engine (which I'm in the process of doing).

Basically, the only thing that I can think of that could still fix the problem is the fuel injectors. I had several things looked at/replaced, but those were the only things I had left to check out before the engine crashed. The list of things I had replaced is as follows:

Spark Plugs
Spark Plug Wires
Ignition Coil
Fuel Pump
And the Fuel Filter

Like I said, without assuming that it is a serious problem that absolutely cannot be fixed, I would assume that it is the fuel injectors. This is probably your best bet, and if you're planning on putting in the shop (which I highly suggest before the problem turns into a new engine), I would simply relay the information I've just given to you, and hope that they might be able to think of something, or simply solve the problem. If things go well, let me know what happened. I'm really curious to find out what the problem is. Thanks!
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Tuesday, November 20th, 2007 AT 8:23 PM
Tiny
SYST3M_FA1LUR_33
  • MEMBER
Do Your Fuel Injectors Need Replacing?
Failed fuel injectors can be a cause for a great many problems with your cars overall performance. Whether your car has an electronic fuel injection system (E.F.I.) Or a constant injection system (C.I.S.) The problems experienced from both are very similar. Here are a list of some of the symptoms you may be having caused by poor fuel distribution by faulty fuel injectors.

(1 Hard Starting
(2 Poor fuel economy
(3 Rough Idle
(4 Car runs fine when cold and terrible when warm
(5 Car will start just fine when cold and not when warm
(6 Getting a fuel smell inside the car
(7 Loss of power in acceleration
(8 Fuel leaking from injector seals or injector

Injectors are just as easy to replace as your spark plugs.

In either system fuel injectors should be replaced every 80,000 to 100,000 miles as a regular maintenance part. Some professionals insist on replacing them and part of a major tune up at about 90,000 miles. The reason for this is that the internal mechanics such as the springs, needle seats, and plungers start to weaken and will not allow the fuel injector to open and close properly. By not opening and closing properly the injector will send too much or too little fuel to the engine causing it to flood itself or starve itself for fuel resulting in the problems listed above. Remember to change all the seals, orings, and holders required with replacing injectors.

Think You Can Just Clean Fuel Injectors.

Most fuel injectors can be cleaned for a while but eventually the constant movement of the internal parts causes the fuel injector to just wear out. Cleaning will not solve this problem. However using a better fuel will always help to keep the injectors clean which will make the injector perform better and longer. Faulty fuel injectors if not replaced can also cause damage to other fuel system parts such as fuel filters, fuel pumps, check valves, fuel regulators, and fuel distributors. This could cause hundreds of dollars in additional repairs. Keep your car on the road longer by replacing your fuel injectors regularly.

I LOOKED UP WHAT MIGHT OCCUR IF YOUR FUEL INJECTORS WERE BAD. IT SOUNDS LIKE ITS YOUR FUEL INJECTORS FROM WHAT I HAVE READ IN THAT PAR.
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Wednesday, November 21st, 2007 AT 9:12 AM

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