Engine swap?

Tiny
SHANSYL
  • MEMBER
  • 2007 MERCURY MILAN
  • 2.3L
  • 4 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 66,000 MILES
On May 5th I paid for an oil change that was never actually performed and as a result my engine seized within two weeks. I have been doing as much research as I can into used engines and such. I had a labor quote of $1,300.00 and an engine with 72,000 miles for $900.00. Then I found a cheaper engine online- 79,000 miles. For $700.00. When I spoke to the guy selling the engine he said his shop could install the engine for $700.00. I am a bit skeptical that the labor and engine are so cheap. I am also weary that the engine only had a three month warranty. I need some advice, is this good deal too good to be true? Additionally, I am not even sure how to go about contacting the company that never did the oil change I paid for, any input is appreciated very much.
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Sunday, June 26th, 2016 AT 5:39 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Good morning

if they did not do the oil change, they wont be responsible for the repair as they did nothing wrong but take your money.

The engine price is about right. The labor spending on the area is not bad. Always add about $200.00 for extras on a big job like that. This is an estimate, not and invoice.

Warranty is real good. Junk yard motors mostly only have thirty days for smoke and noise. Ninety days is very good

Roy
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Sunday, June 26th, 2016 AT 6:58 AM
Tiny
SHANSYL
  • MEMBER
Thanks for your response. I have a receipt that says the oil change was done. They really are not responsible at all? My engine damage is due to being improperly lubricated, none of this would have happened if they had changed the oil. Thanks for your input regarding the price. I am relieved to have gotten a decent deal. Thanks again.
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Sunday, June 26th, 2016 AT 9:13 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Excuse me for butting in, but I have to add a comment of value. I have an 1988 Dodge Grand Caravan that currently has over 420,000 miles on the engine. It was making a knocking noise starting in the 1990's, and I assumed it was not long for this world, so as an experiment to show my students what some engines are capable of, I stopped doing oil changes. It used about a quart to every 1,000 miles, but I often ignored it until there was slightly more than two quarts in it. That is the point at which it no longer shows on the dip stick. There is enough additives in one quart of oil to keep an engine happy, so I was getting plenty of additives to prevent foaming and sludge buildup. Beyond that, the drain plug was not removed and the filter was not changed on well over fourteen years. Its demise was a rubbed-through rear heater hose that resulted in overheating. Dragging around a tandem axle enclosed trailer that was bigger than the van didn't help. Finally blew a head gasket, but it still runs.

Now, you are expecting me to believe your engine seized only two weeks after a scheduled oil change? Engines really are not that smart. A lot of people go strictly by mileage. I have a 1993 Dodge Dynasty, (twenty three years old), that is getting suspiciously close to its second oil change in its life. That one gets its oil changed every 2,500 miles. It's at 4,950 right now.

Between time and mileage, no engine needs the oil changed on such a strict schedule. If that were true, almost every engine on the road would have seized by now. Some people wait until 5,000 miles. Some have it changed every three months regardless of mileage. Ford even used to recommend "every 7,500 miles for normal driving". They pulled that stunt to make their cost of maintenance appear to be lower than that of their competitors. Once you bought the car and read the owner's manual, you found out it was impossible to adhere to the "normal" driving schedule. If you drove in the rain, in the heat of summer, short trips, long trips, winter, etc, it fell under the "severe" schedule that included 3,000 mile oil changes. They have other tricks to get people to buy their cars, but you don't figure them out until after you've owned it a while.

The only thing I can see that might be a contributing factor is if there was a known oil leak and you wanted the oil changed to make it full again. As a driver, I would assume it is full, but it also falls on the driver to check the level at every gas fill up. The "two weeks" is a non-issue. There has to be more to the story that you have not shared or that you're not aware of. Your engine did not seize simply from the oil change being a little late. If the engine cannot tolerate that, you would better look into a different brand of car. It is much more common to read about complaints of engines seizing two weeks after an oil change, and the owners try to blame that on the mechanic. This is the first time I have heard of blaming the shop for not doing a service. Please tell me there is more details that are relevant to the problem.
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Sunday, June 26th, 2016 AT 10:55 PM

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