1995 Dodge Intrepid Transmission or ignition switch

Tiny
PSAL2
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 DODGE INTREPID
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 110,000 MILES
My daughter's 1995 Intrepid had the key stuck in the ignition. It did start, but now doesn't, and the key be turned back to the run position but will not come out of the lock. I was told that it was the cylinder lock, which I replaced, but it will still not let the key come out of the new cylinder. Someone suggested that it is the ignition switch itself and someone said that there is a park plate in the transaxle shift that locks the vehicle in park that allows the key to come out. I can't get the car to a dealer and my daughter doesn't have $100s for a diagnosis. Any suggestions?
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Friday, May 21st, 2010 AT 11:59 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi psal2. Welcome to the forum. Check the shifter interlock cable. If you remove the covers below the steering wheel, you should see the cable end move when you move the shifter. If the shifter is also stuck in park, suspect the cable is broken or disconnected.

Caradiodoc
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Friday, May 21st, 2010 AT 2:06 PM
Tiny
PSAL2
  • MEMBER
No the cable is fine, the battery is fine and now it won't start at all. Just a loud click. Any other suggestion?
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Sunday, May 23rd, 2010 AT 4:16 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Okee doke. A single kind of loud clunk is often the starter solenoid. I've never replaced a starter on an Intrepid so I don't know for sure which one they use, but if it's the small silver Nippendenso starter, they are famous for developing worn solenoid contacts. They are available for 20 bucks, but most people just replace the entire starter. If that's what's wrong, it will crank eventually after cycling the ignition switch enough times. The problem gets progressively worse as the contacts continue to wear.

If it never cranks when cycling the ignition switch, use a test light to measure for voltage on the two large terminals on the starter while a helper turns the ignition switch to "crank". One must have battery voltage all the time and the other must have battery voltage during cranking.

Caradiodoc
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Sunday, May 23rd, 2010 AT 4:46 PM

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