CRV 2006 O2 sensor (bank 1 sensor 1)

Tiny
BABIL
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 HONDA CRV
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 110,000 MILES
Dear Car Pros,

we have a 2006 CRV EX, the engine light is on, using a bluetooth odb2 diagnostic tool, I found the error code given by the car

P0135 - Powertrain
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 1)

The Honda dealer confirmed that is the oxygen sensor that need to be replaced, they are asking $450

I would like to find the part number and research the price. Possible do it myself, otherwise I'll find a local mechanic cheaper than the dealer. Would Denso or Bosh be a good alternative with OE fit? Do you know the part # to research?

After doing some research the Bank 1 Sensor 1 seem to be located near the 1st engine piston. Can the sensor be reached and extracted without removing the front bumper? I am aware that a sensor extractor tool may be required.

Thanks in advance
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Monday, December 21st, 2015 AT 3:37 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
JOHNNYT73
  • EXPERT
If your vehicle is a 4 cylinder then you only have one bank. It will be the first sensor you find when starting at the engine and following the exhaust downward (upstream sensor). You should have two. One before the catalytic converter and one after. The parts may be different in some models based on your installed emissions. I would suggest a Denso part. Here is the part number I could find (Part # 234-9064).

Its much cheaper on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Denso-234-9064-Fuel-Ratio-Sensor/dp/B001F7GJMK
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Monday, December 21st, 2015 AT 4:54 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Yes, either of those brands will work find as long as they are direct fit for that vehicle. Don't use a universal fit.
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Monday, December 21st, 2015 AT 4:55 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
P0135 - Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1 Sensor 1)

Hold on. Diagnostic fault codes never say to replace parts, and this one is a perfect example. When a part is referenced in a fault code, that part is actually the cause of the code about half of the time. Do you want to bet $450.00 on a 50 percent chance?

This code specifically points to the sensor's internal heater circuit. While it is possible for that heater to burn out, that is not very common. It is much more likely one of the wires has been cut or a pair of connector terminals are corroded. Start with a visual examination of the wires, particularly where the harness runs over any metal brackets with sharp edges, and where it could have fallen down onto hot exhaust parts.

If you DO need to replace the sensor, normally the aftermarket brands work just fine, except on Hondas. In fact, some companies buy them from the same suppliers that make them for the original car manufacturers, then put their own brand name on them, but you have no way of knowing which those are. I've heard stories about recurring or new symptoms after a non-original O2 sensor was installed on a Honda, so consider sticking to the Honda part. The issue is in how they report data to the Engine Computer. Even though that aftermarket sensor might not work properly, the heater circuit should not pose a problem. You may get a fault code related to the new sensor, but that code will not be for the heater circuit, if indeed the original code was due to a defective sensor.
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Monday, December 21st, 2015 AT 5:20 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Both sensors share a power supply for the heater and since only one is setting the code, it's a good bet the sensor is bad. I see them all the time. Besides, the dealer already diagnosed this one.
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Monday, December 21st, 2015 AT 5:26 PM

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