Code P1762

Tiny
SCORPEON40
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
  • 4.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 230,000 MILES
When I bought car the shift pressure sensor code p1762 was showing and it seemed I would need to replace and with shift solenoid to be safe. After driving around a little it seems the weather has something to do with issue. Is it possible rain with wet conditions could be causing the sensor to not be working correct? Last few days it has been dry and it has shifted perfect. Same as last week until we got rain. Am I reading more into this. Is there something I could check. I climbed under and do not see any raw wires etc. The vehicle had been sitting a period of time before I started driving. Possibly just driving could this be making a difference. The transmission fluid was low the first time I drove and after adding fluid it seemed to have been the problem until checking the codes and the problem returning. Thanks a head for any help. Jtb
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Friday, March 17th, 2017 AT 3:51 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
P1762 - Gov Press Sen Offset Volts Too Low or high

The common mistake is diagnostic fault codes never say to replace parts or that one is bad. Your observation that weather is involved is a perfect example. When a part is referenced in a fault code, it is actually the cause of that code only about half of the time. This code is usually solved by replacing the solenoid or the pressure sensor, but neither of those have any idea if it is wet outside. The better suspect in this case is corrosion between multiple terminals in an electrical connector due to moisture infiltration. That corrosion can become electrically-conductive when it gets wet, and that can affect the readings the computer sees.
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Friday, March 17th, 2017 AT 4:50 PM
Tiny
SCORPEON40
  • MEMBER
There is a few electric connectors going into trany. Witch one works these components. As well were wpuld I also check and clean as in the other end of connectors Thanks
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Friday, March 17th, 2017 AT 5:47 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Don't worry about which connector. If corrosion is the issue, you wouldn't want to overlook some of them.

The place I would start is by inspecting every terminal to be sure they're clean and shiny. A common cause of frustration is a very light film of corrosion that is temporarily overcome by the scratching action of simply unplugging a connector, then reconnecting it. That can bite through the corrosion and make the symptoms disappear for a few weeks or months.

Another thing to consider is a stretched terminal that doesn't make solid contact with its mate. That can be caused or aggravated by vigorous cleaning. Try to stick a thin pick in alongside the outside of the female terminal to squish it smaller.

If the scratching action of removing the plug makes the problem go away, it may require further attention to be a permanent fix, but if the symptoms don't show up the next time you drive in wet weather, at least you will have further eliminated the parts as the cause of the problem.
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Friday, March 17th, 2017 AT 6:15 PM
Tiny
SCORPEON40
  • MEMBER
Ok thanks. I'm actually going to by some electrical terminal cleaner and take all the connectors out and clean. Thanks again for the help.
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Friday, March 17th, 2017 AT 6:20 PM
Tiny
MAXIMILIAM
  • ADMIN
Let us know what happens. We would love the feedback.
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Monday, March 20th, 2017 AT 7:43 AM

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