1997 Chevy Cavalier

Tiny
PAPI4JUSTU
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 26,200 MILES
My car was running on all cylinders and timing chain went out, it split into two. A shop replaced timing chain and now it runs very rough, shakes real bad at an idle and not as much power as before. They said they did a compression check and my #2 cylinder has no compression. Is it possible the shop did something wrong or did the timing chain splitting into two(I was going 60mph when happened) mess up my cylinder?
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Wednesday, January 21st, 2009 AT 11:48 PM

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Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
Damage is only done if the motor is an "interference" design. I.E. The valves and the pistons overlap in the same place, only kept from colliding by the timing chain.

When the timing chain breaks on a interference design, valves and pistons smash together. If it's not an interference design, the pistons and valves won't come into contact if the timing chain breaks, so odds are no internal damage done.

Replacing a timing chain would not have anything to do with compression at the cylinders so I don't believe the mechanic is at fault here. I would suspect that the timing chain has indeed caused internal damage to your engine.

You can confirm that your engine is an interference design by contacting your local dealer and giving them your VIN and engine size. If it is interference, you will more than likely need major repairs.

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Wednesday, January 21st, 2009 AT 11:57 PM
Tiny
PAPI4JUSTU
  • MEMBER
My cavalier is a non interference design so why do I now have no compression in cylinder?
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Thursday, January 22nd, 2009 AT 12:18 AM
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
Can be a blown head gasket, burnt valve, or a broken ring on that cylinder along with other things. In any event, the engine will need to be opened up and inspected for proper repairs. Timing chain breaking may still have caused the issue, it is just less likely when it is non-interference setup. If you believe the mechanic did do the damage then the best thing to do is take it to a more reputable repair shop. Unless you can prove with hard evidence that the engine was damaged by the mechanic, you really don't have anyway to have him/her repair the engine for free of charge.

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Thursday, January 22nd, 2009 AT 12:39 AM

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