Brake light stays on

Tiny
LEONARDED
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 95,000 MILES
I just changed my master cylinder and my brake light stays on. I checked the fluid it was a little low so I filled it up. But I noticed that I have to fill it after a while when using the car. Is it possible that they did not bleed the brakes?
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Saturday, February 24th, 2018 AT 11:26 AM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If the brakes were not bled, you would have a low, mushy brake pedal.

Which brake light are you referring to? The red "brake" warning light on the dash, or the vehicle's brake lights?

Why did the master cylinder need to be replaced? If the fluid level is going down, has anyone checked for a leak?
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Saturday, February 24th, 2018 AT 7:27 PM
Tiny
LEONARDED
  • MEMBER
It is the dash board light. I just had a oil change and asked the person to check for leak. He said he did not see any. I will just take it back to the place I had it repaired. Oh, they changed the master cylinder because the pedal would slowly go to the floor. Thanks for response. Now I know where to come for information. Thanks again!
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Sunday, February 25th, 2018 AT 10:47 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. A slowly-sinking brake pedal is pretty common, but with a couple of different causes. External leaks that leak slowly include rear wheel cylinders and rusted steel lines. Both of those will result in the brake fluid level dropping in the reservoir.

It is also common for a seal to leak inside the master cylinder resulting in a slowly-sinking brake pedal, but the difference is the fluid level will not drop. This is often the result of improper service procedures or being surprised by a sudden leak, like a ruptured rubber flex hose. Over time, crud and corrosion build up in the lower halves of the bores where the pistons don't normally travel. When a do-it-yourselfer or an inexperienced mechanic pushes the brake pedal all the way to the floor during the bleeding procedure, or when a surprised driver runs the pedal to the floor, the pistons are run over that corrosion and the seals can be ripped. That lets the brake fluid sneak past the seal rather than being pushed down to the wheels. To avoid this, we never push the brake pedal more than half way to the floor when pedal-bleeding with a helper.
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Tuesday, February 27th, 2018 AT 11:07 AM

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