EGR valve location

Tiny
ISHIDASALIA
  • MEMBER
  • 2012 KIA OPTIMA
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • 160,000 MILES
LX model. I have look all over this engine trying to locate the EGR valve to replace it. I have looked all over the internet for a video, or picture, or diagram. None of the manuals from when I purchased the car seem to show it's location as well.

Does anyone happen to know where it is located?
Thanks so much.
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Wednesday, March 6th, 2019 AT 4:55 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome to 2CarPros.

The reason you can't find it is because it doesn't have a traditional EGR valve. Exhaust emissions (CO, HC, NOx) are controlled by a combination of engine modifications and the addition of special control components. Modifications to the combustion chamber, intake manifold, camshaft and ignition system form the basic control system. These items have been integrated into a highly effective system which controls exhaust emissions while maintaining good drivability and fuel economy.

If you are having specific trouble or diagnostic trouble codes that lead you to believe it's and EGR issue, let me know. Also, please provide the code you retrieved.

Take care,
Joe
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, March 6th, 2019 AT 7:10 PM
Tiny
ISHIDASALIA
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe,
Thanks for helping. :)

Here is the breakdown:

Recent trouble (last three months):
Car had pinging sound while accelerating, (usually only during light acceleration, low speeds, and it got significantly worse going uphill). Car would sometimes idle roughly or stutter a bit at low speed (but not too often). Car suddenly started running very very rough, and eventually threw a code that indicated cylinder three misfire. Took it to mechanic who replaced the third cylinder engine coil (I think that's what it was) and replaced the spark plugs and boots. Car later had similar stuttering problems and would occasionally shut off when idling. (Randomly, could drive three hours with no problems, then would start shutting off anytime I let off the gas. Would drive fine the next morning) Eventually it starting shutting off and then gave a code which indicated it was a MAP sensor, which we replaced. It seemed to be fine, but a week later started having stalling problems again and threw the same code. We replaced the MAP sensor again on the advice of AutoZone guy who said it might be a bad part. Was driving fine for a month or so, but it now doing the random stalling again. Random, in this case, meaning it was driving fine for the first four hours I was driving, then suddenly stalled every time I came to a stop or let off the gas. Next morning it drove to AutoZone and back w/o problem. I looked up symptoms on internet and was thought I correctly diagnosed it as a EGR valve problem (being stuck open or close). Went to AutoZone and bought a 2012 Kia Optima Lx EGR valve and was stuck now at trying to find it on the engine.

Very sad to find out it doesn't exist, and autozone employees are apparently unaware of this. This is what the part looks like: https://www.autozone.com/emission-control-and-exhaust/egr-valve/kia/optima

Looks like there might be this part on the Optima:
https://www.autozone.com/emission-control-and-exhaust/egr-vacuum-solenoid/dorman-egr-vacuum-solenoid/177002_448463_0

Sigh, kinda at a loss now as to what to do. Suggestions? Also, there is no engine error code at the moment, even when I could barely get it home from all the stalling.

Thanks again for the help and the long read.
John
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, March 6th, 2019 AT 7:33 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome back, John.

You know, the idea that it doesn't happen and then it does almost sounds like it could be a crankshaft sensor going bad. Take a look through this link:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/symptoms-of-a-bad-crankshaft-sensor

Here are the directions for removal and replacement of the crank sensor:

See pics 1, 2, and 3 correlate with these directions.

Removal

1. Turn the ignition switch OFF and disconnect the battery negative (-) cable.
2. Disconnect the crankshaft position sensor connector (A).

picture 1
3. Remove the protector (A).

picture 2
4. Remove the installation bolt (A), and then remove the crankshaft position sensor.

picture 3

Installation

CAUTION:
- Install the component with the specified torques.
- Note that internal damage may occur when the component is dropped. In this case, use it after inspecting.

CAUTION:
- Apply the engine oil to the O-ring.

CAUTION:
- Insert the sensor in the installation hole and be careful not to damage when installation.

1. Installation is reverse of removal.

Crankshaft position sensor installation bolt:
9.8 - 11.8 N.m (1.0 - 1.2 kgf.m, 7.2 - 8.7 lb-ft)
Crankshaft position sensor protector installation bolt (M6):
9.8 - 11.8 N.m (1.0 - 1.2 kgf.m, 7.2 - 8.7 lb-ft)
Crankshaft position sensor protector installation bolt (M8):
18.6 - 23.5 N.m (1.9 - 2.4 kgf.m, 13.7 - 17.4 lb-ft)

Next, the pinging you heard can be caused by a knock sensor. This sensor is designed to fine tune ignition timing for best performance.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-a-knock-sensor-works

Here are the directions for removal and replacement of the knock sensor. Check to make wiring to it is clean and tight. Pictures 4 and 5 correlate with these directions.

Removal

1. Turn the ignition switch OFF and disconnect the battery negative (-) cable.
2. Drain the engine coolant .
3. Remove the radiator upper hose .
4. Disconnect the knock sensor connector (A).

imageOpen In New TabZoom/Print

5. Remove the intake manifold .
6. Remove the installation bolt (A), and then remove the sensor from the cylinder block.

imageOpen In New TabZoom/Print

Installation

CAUTION:
- Install the component with the specified torques.
- Note that internal damage may occur when the component is dropped. In this case, use it after inspecting.

1. Installation is reverse of removal.

Knock sensor installation bolt:
18.6 - 23.5 N.m (1.9 - 2.4 kgf.m, 13.7 - 17.4 lb-ft)

Also, a vacuum leak could cause idle issues and stalling. Take a look through this. It shows how to check for a leak:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-use-an-engine-vacuum-gauge

By chance, do you have the diagnostic trouble code that comes up at times?

One last thing. The engine idle speed is controlled by an idle air control valve (IAC). The IAC allows a metered amount of air to enter the engine when your foot is off the throttle. If it is failing or dirty it can cause stalling or rough idle issues.

_______________________

If you have the code that shows up, let me know what it is. It will help me pinpoint possible issues.

Joe

Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, March 7th, 2019 AT 5:34 PM
Tiny
ISHIDASALIA
  • MEMBER
The code the two previous times was the p0106 code. The car hasn't stalled again the 10 small errand trips I've done in last few days. Worries me it's gonna do it's crazy stalling thing in the middle of rush hour or something. Going to drive it all day tomorrow (10+hrs) and see if I can make it stall again. If so, gonna see if I'm skilled enough for that knock sensor or If I need to get mechanics help with it. Thanks again.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, March 7th, 2019 AT 6:13 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Happy to help. Let me know if I can help in any way. Also, let me know how it runs tomorrow for you.

Take care,
Joe
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, March 7th, 2019 AT 7:04 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Sponsored links