2004 Dodge Neon P2074

Tiny
JMILLER501
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 DODGE NEON
  • 2.0L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 67,000 MILES
I got a P2074 code the other day. I replaced the map sensor and tps sensor. And now it still wants to stall out at stop signs. Radio cuts out before any of this happens. The seat belt light and check engine light comes on with a ding sound. This is the same thing that has been going in for a few days now
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Tuesday, June 16th, 2015 AT 6:42 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Diagnostic fault codes never say to replace parts or that they're bad. They only indicate the circuit or system that needs further diagnosis, or the unacceptable operating condition. Code 2074 just indicates the two sensors don't agree, but it doesn't say why. For example, one might say you're at wide-open-throttle while the other one says you're under light load. Those two conditions don't agree, and that is what must be diagnosed.

To add to the problem, no two sensors are ever exactly alike. The Engine Computer had learned "minimum throttle" from the old throttle position sensor, and any time it saw that signal voltage, it knew your foot was off the accelerator pedal and it had to be in control of idle speed. If the lowest voltage your new sensor ever reaches is just.01 volt higher than that of the old sensor, the computer will never see that voltage that tells it to maintain idle speed. Until you meet the conditions for the relearn to take place, the engine may be hard to start unless you hold the accelerator pedal down 1/4", you won't get the nice "idle flare-up" to 1500 rpm at start-up, and the engine will tend to stall at stop signs. To meet the conditions for the relearn to take place, drive at highway speed with the engine warmed up, then coast for at least seven seconds without touching the pedals.

This idle problem is in addition to whatever was the original problem. A good place to start looking is to follow the smaller positive battery wire to the under-hood fuse box, and be sure that connection is clean and tight. Follow the smaller negative battery wire to the body and be sure that one is tight and not rusty. The next suspect would be overheated contacts inside the ignition switch, and the terminals in its connector.
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Tuesday, June 16th, 2015 AT 7:12 PM
Tiny
JMILLER501
  • MEMBER
Ok I will be trying this. It started when it rained really heavy. Then it went away until yesterday.
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Tuesday, June 16th, 2015 AT 7:22 PM
Tiny
JMILLER501
  • MEMBER
Cardiodoc thank you very much. It is running great now. Problem was I lost one of thw screwa for the map sensor and found it after I got one to use. After I installed the one I lost I run just fine. I cant tahnk you enough. As a volunteer firefighter I depend on my car to get me to the station when ppager sounds. And I am leaving for vacation today I am happy you helped me
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Thursday, June 18th, 2015 AT 4:39 AM

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