2002 Dodge Intrepid knock sensor

Tiny
PROBLEM2002
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 DODGE INTREPID
  • 2.7L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 122,000 MILES
How to replace a knock sensor on my 2.7L engine?
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Monday, July 14th, 2014 AT 10:43 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
What is the 8th digit of the VIN#?
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Tuesday, July 15th, 2014 AT 5:34 AM
Tiny
PROBLEM2002
  • MEMBER
2B3HD46R52H242755
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Tuesday, July 15th, 2014 AT 5:01 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
REMOVAL
The sensor screws into the cylinder block, directly below the intake manifold.

Remove intake manifold plenum. Refer to the Engine section.
Remove the passenger side cylinder head. Refer to the Engine section.

Fig. 12 Knock Sensor - 2.7L
https://www.2carpros.com/images/external/92772578.gif

Disconnect electrical connector from knock sensor.
Use a crows foot socket to remove the knock sensors.

INSTALLATION

Install knock sensor. Tighten knock sensor to 10 Nm (7 ft. lbs.) torque. Over or under tightening effects knock sensor performance resulting in possible improper spark control.
Install the passenger side cylinder head. Refer to the Engine section.
Attach electrical connector to knock sensor.
Install intake manifold plenum. Refer to the Engine section.
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Tuesday, July 15th, 2014 AT 5:05 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Don't be in too much of a hurry to tackle this job yourself. It's 9 hours of flat rate and you have to take half the engine apart.
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Tuesday, July 15th, 2014 AT 5:07 PM
Tiny
PROBLEM2002
  • MEMBER
I seen on your sight about swapping out a 2.7 with a 3.5 Is it true theirs two 3.5s one begin a high output and will that work?
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Friday, July 25th, 2014 AT 2:11 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
No, your operating system will only operate the 2.7. Besides, that would be against Federal law to do that.
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Friday, July 25th, 2014 AT 2:25 PM
Tiny
PROBLEM2002
  • MEMBER
Its not against federal law. I, m 61 and been doing engine swaps all my life, Have you heard of DOT.
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Saturday, July 26th, 2014 AT 1:04 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Well, I'm older than you and have been in this business for nearly 50 years. Apparently you have never heard of the EPA. Your car received an emissions certification when it left the assembly line and it is against Federal law to modify that package in any way.

Quote:

Supplemental Information
Potential Tampering Liability Associated with Fuel Economy Retrofit Devices

The federal tampering prohibition is contained in section 203(a)(3) of the Clean Air Act (Act), 42
U.S.C. 7522(a)(3). Section 203(a)(3)(A) of the Act prohibits any person from removing or
rendering inoperative any device or element of design installed on or in any motor vehicle in
compliance with regulations under Title II of the Act (i.E, regulations requiring certification that
vehicles meet federal emissions standards). The maximum civil penalty for a violation of this
section by a manufacturer or dealer is $25,000; for any other person, $2,500.

Section 203(a)(3)(B) of the Act prohibits any person from manufacturing or selling, or offering to
sell, or installing, any part or component intended for use with, or as part of, any motor vehicle or
motor vehicle engine where a principal effect of the part or component is to bypass, defeat, or
render inoperative any device or element of design installed on or in a motor vehicle or motor
vehicle engine, and where the person knows or should know that such part or component is being
offered for sale or is being installed for such use. The maximum civil penalty for a violation of
this section is $2,500.

Installing any device, system or part(s) which affect the fuel delivery rate or the combustion
process would be expected to affect elements of design of the emissions control system.
Accordingly, any change from the original certified configuration of a vehicle such as adding a
system or parts that affect the fuel delivery rate or the combustion process, or the manufacture,
sale of, or installation of, aftermarket parts or systems which are not equivalent to the original
equipment could be considered violations of section 203(a)(3) of the Act.
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Saturday, July 26th, 2014 AT 2:07 PM

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