2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee Jeep Grand Cherokee

Tiny
EMIRANDA
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
  • 4.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • RWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 133,000 MILES
I have a 2001 jeep grand cherokee 4.0 liter inline 6 and it overheated on the highway because I didnt know I had an oil leak, I let it cool, added 5 quarts because it was bone dry, the truck started but with a bad rod noise or something of the manner the noise was coming from just underneath valve cover. The truck drives and shuts off after about a mile or so with smoke coming from oil filler cap and oil dipstick hole.I tend to do things on my own in this truck, is this a job worth the undertaking and whats really wrong with my jeep?Is is salvageable?Now it shows that its not overheating by the temp gauge but engine gets really hot really fast.
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 28th, 2013 AT 9:39 AM

8 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If there's a rod knock, the bearings have been damaged and the resulting low oil pressure is going to do much more damage if you keep trying to force it to run. The engine already needs to be totally rebuilt but some of the internal parts may still be salvageable. For sure the crankshaft and connecting rod bearings are gone. Over the course of a few miles driving it like that, some of the connecting rods will get hammered out and will need to be replaced. With no oil pressure, no oil sprayed onto the cylinder walls to keep the pistons lubricated. They will be scuffed and the cylinder walls will be scored. The cylinders will need to be bored oversize and new pistons and piston rings will be needed. Almost certainly the crankshaft will need to be machined or replaced. Camshaft lobes are very sensitive to lack of lubrication so most likely it and the lifters will need to be replaced.

It will probably be less expensive and faster to find a good used engine from a salvage yard. Many of the larger ones can install it for you too.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 28th, 2013 AT 10:07 AM
Tiny
EMIRANDA
  • MEMBER
My oil pressure has stayed up eversince I added oil, at around 50 or so. Does that still mean the bearings are bad?Could the knock come from somewhere else or is that the only part that would sound in this way?Thanks for the inbut btw.I might just do what you are saying and just buy anoher engine from the salvage yard
.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 28th, 2013 AT 10:15 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hold the phone. I'm only going by what you've posted so far. If the oil pressure is good, it is doubtful a bearing has "spun", meaning it is destroyed. One of those will be the first thing to go when serious damage occurs. With good oil pressure, most likely you are not hearing a connecting rod knock. That is pretty loud, and people in the parking lot will run to get out of your way when they hear you coming. If you're hearing a light ticking up higher in the engine, that is likely the valve lifters that have bled down from lack of oil. That is relatively minor and will go away on its own. At the mileage you listed, it's not uncommon for a lifter to be reluctant to pump up with oil right away. I had an old car that had one lifter that always took at least 30 miles to quiet down after every oil change, then it was fine until the next oil change.

Before we assume you need a different engine or a rebuild, have a mechanic listen to any noises that are still there. A collapsed lifter sounds a whole lot different than a rod knock.

Sorry to leave you hanging for so long. I'm fighting a dying computer that is on its last legs.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 28th, 2013 AT 6:22 PM
Tiny
JJIMENEZ88911
  • MEMBER
I agree with the rod knock sound being loud and obvious but it sound as if the loss of oil pressure may have overheated the cylinders and piston rings causing scoring of the cylinder walls and damage to rings this makes sense of high blow by and excessive compression at oil cap and dipstick tube and overheat as well at that point have to agree with comment from before oil pressure fine so no bearing spun but due believe rebuild may be in this vehicles future unfortunately.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 28th, 2013 AT 8:55 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Do a cylinder leakage test first before you condemn the engine. If the rings are not sealing, you'll hear the air escaping at the oil cap or dipstick tube.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 28th, 2013 AT 9:07 PM
Tiny
EMIRANDA
  • MEMBER
Ok first off thanks for your time and your efforts. Ok now that the sound is squared away I would like to give a a step by step of the other issue which probably stems from the overheat. The vehicle starts up great, sound goesand comes, when I put a load on it (drive), it putts and putts till finally getting impulse and drives great till the red light where I have to go into netral. Itll drive for a good two miles or so till it reaches operating temp then starts smoking white smke from under the hood, which means that when it reaches the temperature to burn coolant the smoke gets worse.I agree the vehicle will need an engine rebuild in the future and only need it for work so I just wanna get from point a to point b. And im also grateful that I didnt kill it completely, srry for the trouble guys.4.0 truly a great engine hands down.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, December 29th, 2013 AT 9:27 AM
Tiny
EMIRANDA
  • MEMBER
Im to the point where all I want it is to drive more than just till operating temp. Could I have blown my head gasket in the process?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, December 29th, 2013 AT 9:32 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
White smoke IS a sign of a leaking cylinder head gasket, but only when it comes out of the tail pipe. Something else is going on when you see smoke under the hood. A hose or gasket likely has a small leak and the coolant is puddling somewhere, and burning off when it gets hot. The obvious clue is the coolant level will be going down in the reservoir. If it is, a cooling system pressure test may identify the source of the leak. If it doesn't, you can add a small bottle of dark purple dye to the coolant, then check a few days later with a black light. The dye will show up as a bright yellow stain that you can follow back to the source. If you see the dye inside the tail pipe, suspect a leaking cylinder head gasket, but that's not common on that engine.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, December 29th, 2013 AT 2:11 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides