WHAT DO I NEED TO DO TO GET THIS CAR TO RUN?

  • Tiny
  • Ronniedavis
  • 2001 DODGE INTREPID
  • 140,000 MILES

I took a 99 crysler 300 3.5 and put it in an 01 intrepid 3.5 I changed every thing over from the junk one to the good. Now that its done aand in it wount start im getting p off can u help?

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Thursday, September 13th, 2012 AT 12:25 PM

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  • Tiny
  • Wrenchtech
  • EXPERT
  • 20,567 POSTS

Did all the sensors and wiring match up perfectly?

Were any sensors different and swapped?
What exactly did you swap over?

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Thursday, September 13th, 2012 AT 1:17 PM
  • Tiny
  • Ronniedavis
  • MEMBER

Every thing matched up perfectly I swaped every thing over from the junk one to the good one includeing intake and plentum

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 1:25 AM
  • Tiny
  • Wrenchtech
  • EXPERT
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I asked exactly what you swapped over, not just a response of "everything".

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 1:36 AM
  • Tiny
  • Ronniedavis
  • MEMBER

O2sencer, temp sencer, crank sencer cam sencer, intake, plentum injectors, coils, I didnt swap the fly wheel because it was the same.

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 1:57 AM
  • Tiny
  • Wrenchtech
  • EXPERT
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See, that's where you may be wrong. These Crank sensors see to operate differently.

From 01 Intrepid

[quote]The crankshaft position sensor detects slots cut into the transmission driveplate extension. There are 3 sets of slots. Two sets contain 4 slots and one set contains 5 slots, for a total of 13 slots. Basic timing is set by the position of the last slot in each group. Once the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) senses the last slot, it determines which piston will be next at TDC from the camshaft position sensor input. It may take the PCM one engine revolution to determine crankshaft position.

The PCM uses crankshaft position reference to determine injector sequence and ignition timing. Once the PCM determines crankshaft position, it begins energizing the injectors and coils in sequence.

The PCM uses the Crankshaft Position sensor to calculate the following:

Engine rpm
TDC number 1 and 4
Ignition coil synchronization
Injector synchronization
Camshaft-to-crankshaft misalignment timing belt skipped 1 tooth or more diagnostic trouble code)[/quote]

From Chrysler 300M

[quote]The crankshaft position sensor detects slots cut into the transmission driveplate extension. There are 3 sets of slots. Each set contains 4 or 5 slots, for a total of 13 slots. Basic timing is set by the position of the last slot in each group. Once the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) senses the last slot, it determines crankshaft position (which piston will next be at TDC) from the camshaft position sensor input. The 4 pulses generated by the crankshaft position sensor represent the 690, 490, 290, and 90 BTDC marks. It may take the PCM one engine revolution to determine crankshaft position.

The PCM uses crankshaft position reference to determine injector sequence and ignition timing. Once the PCM determines crankshaft position, it begins energizing the injectors in sequence.[/Quote]

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 2:05 AM
  • Tiny
  • Ronniedavis
  • MEMBER

So if I put the crank and cam sencer back in from the 300 it should start?

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 2:19 AM
  • Tiny
  • Wrenchtech
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Not necessarily. Your computer may not be programmed for that. I can't tell you for sure what is happening but you should never attempt these cross swaps unless they are proven. They can change all kinds of things within the operating system from year to year. The Crank could be different, the cams could be different. Nobody knows.

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 2:22 AM
  • Tiny
  • Ronniedavis
  • MEMBER

Ok any suggestions?

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 2:30 AM
  • Tiny
  • Wrenchtech
  • EXPERT
  • 20,567 POSTS

Go back to basics and determine just what the car is or isn't doing to help determine what system to look at.

All "crank, no start" conditions are approached in the same way. Every engine requires certain functions to be able to run. Some of these functions rely on specific components to work and some components are part of more than one function so it is important to see the whole picture to be able to conclude anything about what may have failed. Also, these functions can ONLY be tested during the failure. Any other time and they will simply test good because the problem isn't present at the moment.
If you approach this in any other way, you are merely guessing and that only serves to replace unnecessary parts and wastes money.

Every engine requires spark, fuel and compression to run. That's what we have to look for.

These are the basics that need to be tested and will give us the info required to isolate a cause.

1) Test for spark at the plug end of the wire using a spark tester. If none found, check for power supply on the + terminal of the coil with the key on.

2) Test for injector pulse using a small bulb called a noid light. If none found, check for power supply at one side of the injector with the key on.

3) Use a fuel pressure gauge to test for correct fuel pressure, also noticing if the pressure holds when key is shut off.

4) If all of these things check good, then you would need to do a complete compression test.

Once you have determined which of these functions has dropped out,
you will know which system is having the problem.

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 2:32 AM
  • Tiny
  • Ronniedavis
  • MEMBER

There isnt spark and there is fuel preasure.I know the engine ran strong because I drove the car before I pulled it out of the 300

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 AT 2:44 AM

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