I have a 1

Tiny
RONSTA32
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 VOLKSWAGEN GOLF
  • 62,000 MILES
I have a 1.9gt tdi whenever I give it any prolonged stick the turbo cuts out and wont boost again until I turn off the ignition and restart it and it works perfectly again. No smoke no bearing rattle no warning lights? I've heard the this car has turbo problems?
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 AT 9:39 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Don't quite understand your question -give more details
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 AT 10:42 PM
Tiny
EXOVCDS
  • MEMBER
Your engine is over-boosting. If the ECM can not control boost
via the turbo vanes, the ECM cuts fuel to reduce engine power.

Once you cycle the key, the ECM again provides boost until it sees
an over-boost condition.

Your turbo vane rod is probably stuck in the "down" position, which
causes rapid spool of the turbo & high boost.

You need to free-up the rod/vanes by working the rod up & down
manually.

When the engine is off, the rod is supposed to be extended from
the actuator pod. Once the engine is started, the rod is pulled
down by the actuator.

You need to lift the vehicle and look at the turbo from under the
car, to be able to see the actuator & rod.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, February 18th, 2012 AT 10:23 PM
Tiny
RONSTA32
  • MEMBER
Thanks very much for your reply my mechanic/brother inlaw suggested cataclean and a blast at 3 thousand revs for a run may free it? If not and manualy working the rod doesnt work is it a seperate and replaceable part thanks again for your feedback.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, March 2nd, 2012 AT 8:07 PM
Tiny
EXOVCDS
  • MEMBER
I have been able to free-up the vanes by manually pushing them
back and then applying vacuum to the actuator to pull them down
again.

To clean them 100%, you need to remove the turbo and disassemble
it.

Here is a clip on what a clean assembly looks like:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu0UGKS7-JQ

Here is a clip with the actuator attached:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdqMmB3hxTM

When the actuator has vacuum applied, the vane rod gets pulled
down... this causes the turbo to spin faster for low speed
acceleration.

If the vanes remain stuck down (even when no vacuum is applied to
the actuator), the turbo will overboost and the ECM then cuts
fuel to reduce power.

Carbon build-up in the intake & turbo vanes will happen more quickly
on vehicles that are mainly driven in the city (stop & go traffic).

More frequent highway driving (higher speed & load) can blow-out
carbon that has not yet packed solid.

Good luck.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, March 3rd, 2012 AT 12:36 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides