Transmission - 2000 Dodge Dakota

Tiny
CONNIECCRN
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 DODGE DAKOTA
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 120,000 MILES
I have a 2000 dodge dakota - 8 cyl, 318, automatic transmission. The trans stopped working - just stopped, while I was driving - no forward, no reverse. An old mechanic has looked at it and told me it is a mitsubishi tranny and there is an oil filter in there that has never been changed. He said I need a new (used) transmission. Okay, I have my doubts. I had NO problems prior to this - no hinting that the trans might go out. Any ideas?

connieccrn2003@yahoo. Com
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Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 AT 12:41 AM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Put it in neutral and try to push the truck. If you can't, it's still in park and the shifter linkage is disconnected.

Never heard of a Mitsubishi transmission in a Dakota. All I ever saw was the tough Chrysler A-904 with an overdrive unit attached.

Caradiodoc
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Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 AT 1:15 AM
Tiny
CONNIECCRN
  • MEMBER
Thank you for the quick response.
The truck has been moved, so there is no problem with the linkage. Although the mechanic is recommended to me, he is about 70 (please don't laugh - I live in a VERY small town) and I don't think he has a computer to hook up to it. He told me he dropped the pan and there was an oil filter in there. Is that possible?
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Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 AT 2:05 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yup, all automatics have filters. Most manufacturers recommend replacing the filter and fluid every 36,000 miles. I have an '88 Grand Caravan with 223,000 miles. I pull an enclosed trailer that's bigger than the van, and the filter has been changed once in its life! "Do as I say, not as I do".

There really isn't much in the transmission that can cause a total loss of any functions unless the fluid has leaked out. One thing that should be checked is to be sure the four bolts haven't fallen out from the torque converter. They connect the engine to the transmission. It's not common for them to come loose, and in the rare event they do, they usually cause a lot of banging noises first. Still, it's something to not overlook.

Caradiodoc
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Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 AT 3:23 AM
Tiny
CONNIECCRN
  • MEMBER
We are not communicating well. I understand the difference between a transmission fluid filter and an oil filter. The mechanic told me it was an OIL filter. THERE WAS NO PROBLEM OR NOISE before it just stopped.

Can you research this problem further. Ask your buddies or something? I just don't think it is as complicated as this old mechanic says it is. Maybe I should just take it to a regular transmission place in the closest big town?

I had found a similar problem on another web site -

Message:
I have a 2000 dakota 3.9 2 wheel dr. With 130,000 miles and a history of many problems. The latest one is the tranny. Without any symptons it just stopped moving in any gear. No slipping no noise no roughness. HELP! Any suggestions on what it could be short of replacing the unit ( I'm Broke)

frankeboy,
When mine stopped shifting a new set of solenoids was all that required. Couple hundred, including ATF-4 top-off, at my trannie guy.

Any ideas along those lines? My mechanic said there were no solenoids in the transmission. Sometimes I think he is not even looking at my truck!
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Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 AT 5:30 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
A lot of other people will read these replies, just like you did on that other web site. That's why I included the story about the torque converter bolts. I said usually they make noise first implying that was not the problem in your case, but that might benefit someone else.

Transmission fluid IS hydraulic oil and it must be filtered. It is common to call it the transmission fluid oil filter.

The transmissions that use a solenoid pack are in the front-wheel-drive cars and minivans starting with the 1989 models. In the event of a total electrical or computer failure, the solenoids are spring-loaded to allow use of park, reverse, neutral, and second gears. The computer will also shut the system down when it detects a problem, and again, you have use of those gears. Those computer-controlled transmissions were not used in the trucks in 2000. You still have a version of the really tough 904 or 727 that was used in the '60s through the '80s, with an overdrive assembly added on. The place to start is by testing the main line pressure. If it is 0 psi, there could be a problem with the front pump or filter. If there is pressure, there could be a problem in the valve body, (not likely since the problem occurred while it was already in gear and moving), or something broke in the torque converter. It WOULD make sense to take it to a transmission specialist. They will be familiar with the transmission and any problem they find, they've seen it before.

Caradiodoc
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Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 AT 6:34 PM
Tiny
CONNIECCRN
  • MEMBER
Thank you.I apologize if I was too blunt - frustration is the reason, but not the excuse.

I am going to see about getting it towed to the nearest town with a reputable transmission place. If it turns out that dang transmission is a Mitsubishi. Well, I guess we can all be hog-tied!
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Wednesday, December 8th, 2010 AT 12:13 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Me too. I only have a '99 service manual which should be the same, but my school was one of three that Chrysler used as remote training facilities so after leaving the dealership and the factory training, I got to sit in on their classes at school and at their update classes at our yearly state-called meetings. I never heard one word about Mitsubishi transmissions, but all that means is they didn't bring it up. You never know what variations there are out there.

Ask the specialist if your transmission is a version of the smaller 904 or the really beefy 727 with an overdrive added. That will clinch it. They can tell by looking at the pan. On the 904 it is square with one side corner partially shaved off. The 727 is basically square too but with an extra rounded bump on the right front corner.

If they confirm it's some kind of Mitsubishi unit, ask if it is computer-controlled or hydraulically-controlled like older transmissions. That would be cause to want to dig into a newer service manual to learn about it.

Hope they find something simple.

Caradiodoc
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Wednesday, December 8th, 2010 AT 12:53 AM

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