1997 Plymouth Breeze fuse #5 blows

Tiny
JKAD11
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 PLYMOUTH BREEZE
  • 2.0L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 170,000 MILES
Power ok, crank and #5 fuse. Pcm-asd, blows. Unplug alternator and it blows on turn key to on.
switched asd relay with fan relay ---no good still
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Friday, August 8th, 2014 AT 3:07 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Please clarify that and add any details or observations. Your description is difficult to understand.

What does this mean: "Power ok, crank and #5 fuse."

This is confusing: "Pcm-asd, blows." Are you saying the Engine Computer blew up? Are you referring to the automatic shutdown relay? The circuit?

"Unplug alternator and it blows on turn key to on." What led you to the alternator? That IS fed by the ASD relay but it rarely causes a problem.

"switched asd relay with fan relay ---no good still" What does "no good" mean? That fuse # 5 still blows? If that's right, please say it so I don't misinterpret something and send you the wrong way. Also, thanks to a recent major house fire, I'm sitting ten miles from my service manuals so I don't have easy access to a wiring diagram. What is fuse #5 for? Is that the ASD fuse? When does it blow? Right away when you turn on the ignition switch or does it take some time?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Friday, August 8th, 2014 AT 10:37 PM
Tiny
JKAD11
  • MEMBER
Sorry to be confusing, but it is like I said. #5 fuse is for PCM-ASD.
I found the problem. But just for you if this comes up ever, I 'll tell you what it
is. So yes I at 1st thought it was pcm prob, or asd relay. After ruling theyre not it , I finally looked at the right wire diagram. That's when I went to the end of the circuit, which is the alternator, so when I unplugged it and it blow #5 at key on-wow more voltage going in. Next logical place was coil. Lots of components on green/orange wire. So there is where I found the wire to coil cut, laying on the metal bar(bracket) for whatever. Taped up wire. And presto! No more problem
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, August 8th, 2014 AT 11:18 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. Happy I could be of help, (not). The more common cause is the wiring to the oxygen sensors falls down onto hot exhaust parts, the insulation melts, and the heater wire shorts to ground. That is another circuit that comes off the ASD relay.

For future reference, here's a trick that will help you avoid wasting so many fuses:

A simple trick to finding a short is to replace the blown fuse with a pair of spade terminals, then use small jumper wires to connect them to a 12 volt light bulb. A brake light bulb works well. When the circuit is live and the short is present, the bulb will be full brightness and hot so be sure it's not laying on the carpet or against a plastic door panel. Now you can unplug electrical connectors and move things around to see what makes the short go away. When it does, the bulb will get dim or go out.

With the ASD relay, it only gets turned on for one second when the ignition switch is turned on. Obviously that's not enough time to do any troubleshooting. It turns on again during engine rotation, (cranking or running), so that isn't practical either. To allow you to power up the circuit to diagnose it, it's easiest to bypass the relay. You don't even need the ignition switch on. Jump terminals 30 and 87 together. The things on that circuit are the ignition coil pack, injectors, alternator field, oxygen sensor heaters, and fuel pump or pump relay. The feed wire to all of them is a dark green / orange wire.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Saturday, August 9th, 2014 AT 12:15 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Sorry about that drawing. Try this one.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Saturday, August 9th, 2014 AT 12:17 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides