1996 Mazda Protege rack and pinion

  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • 154,000 MILES

What makes of vehicles are compatible for the rack and pinion on a 96 mazda protege I have a broke rack and pinion and I am trying to find out what other vehicles I could use to replace my rack and pinion

Do you
have the same problem?
Friday, December 27th, 2013 AT 3:26 PM

1 Reply


There's a few ways to find that out. The fastest is to visit any salvage yard and have them look in their "Hollander" Guide. That is a really big book that lists almost every part on a specific car model, and gives them a code number. You look that number up in the back of the book and it will list every year, make, and model that part fits. I think it will even specify optional choices like if it has speed-sensitive steering, "quick-ratio" steering for a sportier feel, etc. Few people outside of salvage yards have those books because they're very expensive. If you're going to be looking for the same interchange information many times, you can find older Hollander guides on eBay, usually for less than $100.00 per book. Be sure to read the years and car types each book covers because there's a lot of them.

The next choice is to bother someone at an auto parts store to look up the part number for various other models to see which ones are the same. That's fine if that person is your friend or has nothing better to be doing because it can take a long time.

When I'm trying to find this information, I use the Rock Auto web site and look at the different numbers for multiple models. They even list the parts from many suppliers and all the multiple choices for optional equipment and systems.

I DO know that Chrysler has always been famous for good parts interchangeability, so when I see two different part numbers for a part that I think should be the same, further investigation usually shows there's a small difference that can be worked around. An example would be a slightly repositioned port for a steel line that requires a simple bend in your line. In a later model year there can be a change made to improve reliability, and that will result in a new part number. If all the splines and dimensions stay the same, the new part number will replace your older part, and you are likely to get the improved version when you buy a rebuilt assembly, but to know for sure, that's where the Hollander Guide is what you need.

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Friday, December 27th, 2013 AT 3:50 PM

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