1995 Volkswagen Cabriolet Front right brakes

Tiny
DABB
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 VOLKSWAGEN CABRIOLET
  • 2.0L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
No brake fluid coming out off the brake line?
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Friday, March 21st, 2014 AT 5:55 PM

11 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That's WAY too much information to digest at one time. I have no idea if you're doing a brake job, having a braking problem, have a fluid leak, etc. If you'd care to take the time to include some history, symptoms, clues, observations, or a question, I'll do my best to suggest a course of action.
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Saturday, March 22nd, 2014 AT 9:24 AM
Tiny
DABB
  • MEMBER
I bleed the brakes rr, rl, FR, rl, when got to the FR there was no brake fluid T all. There no leaks, just was doing a brake bleeding brake pedal was spongy.
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Sunday, March 23rd, 2014 AT 8:17 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Given the combination of a mushy brake pedal and apparent blockage in one line, the first thing that comes to mind is the brake fluid is contaminated with a petroleum product like engine oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid, or even axle grease. That will cause all rubber parts to swell and expand. The lip seals in the master cylinder will grow past the fluid return ports. That will block fluid flow when gravity-bleeding the brakes, and they won't retract far enough to take a new bite of fluid when pedal-bleeding with a helper. The clue to fluid contamination is the rubber bladder seal under the reservoir cap will be blown up and mushy. The only proper fix is to remove all parts that have rubber that contacts the brake fluid, flush and dry the steel lines, then replace all the parts with rubber in them.

Another, less common cause of blockage is pushing the brake pedal all the way to the floor when bleeding the system or when you're surprised by a sudden leak. The pedal should never be pushed more than half way down unless the master cylinder is less than about a year old. Crud and corrosion build up in the lower halves of the bores where the pistons don't normally travel. Running the pedal more than half way down runs the lip seals over that crud and can rip them. That results in a low and mushy pedal or one that sinks slowly under steady foot pressure. In rare instances some of that corrosion can break loose and get pushed into one of the steel lines. If you suspect that, you can often clear it by disconnecting that line at the master cylinder, opening the bleeder screw on the caliper, then giving it a quick, short burst of compressed air into the bleeder screw.

There's going to more wrong than just blockage in one steel line because that would cause a higher brake pedal that's unusually firm. If that line was loosened, brake fluid would flow from the connection even though it doesn't flow at the wheel.
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Sunday, March 23rd, 2014 AT 11:11 AM
Tiny
EXOVCDS
  • MEMBER
Remove the bleeder, insert a straightened paper clip in to the hole that the bleeder was in. If it was blocked, the paper clip will have loosened the debris and fluid will flow.

If the bleeder is plugged, simply use the same paper clip or something smaller and poke into both ends one at a time and blow through the bleeder until unplugged.
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Tuesday, March 25th, 2014 AT 8:06 PM
Tiny
DABB
  • MEMBER
The vw cabrio 1995 have an ABS system, I took the bleeding valve out checked it and is clear, I also took the main line out off the caliper and no brake fluid. Today I went and buy a one person brake pressure bleeder, did not work line is dry. I also I notice that the ABS light is on, I was thinking maybe the sensor are bad? At this point I don't know what to next, never deal with ABS system before.
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Friday, March 28th, 2014 AT 3:22 PM
Tiny
DABB
  • MEMBER
Good points, But on your resume I didn't see that you have any experience on German build VW Cabrio 1995, it is very important for information that you provide this car are very unique.
Thanks
VR
Need help
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Friday, March 28th, 2014 AT 3:28 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Assuming there is no defect in the ABS hydraulic controller, which there likely isn't, you treat the brake system the same way as any other system. As far as bleeding the system, you don't have to do anything special.

I'd head right to the master cylinder and loosen the steel line there, then see if you get any brake fluid to come out. If you don't, suspect contaminated brake fluid. We'll have to discuss the repair for that. If you do get fluid, tighten that fitting, then move to the next connection down the line and do the same thing.
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Friday, March 28th, 2014 AT 6:46 PM
Tiny
DABB
  • MEMBER
Thanks I'll try today to see what happen.
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Sunday, March 30th, 2014 AT 9:16 AM
Tiny
EXOVCDS
  • MEMBER
Sorry about the late reply. I do not get updates to posts as I am not a 2car expert.

Caradiodoc is correct that the system is a standard all car specific system.

If you have no fluid coming out of the master cylinder where the brake line attaches, then the problem is at the MC. If you get fluid coming out, but not at the next fitting (where the hose meets the metal line in the wheel well), then the plug is somewhere in the line. If nothing at the hose by the caliper, then the hose is plugged.

The ABS does NOT come into play when bleeding. Since the ABS only kicks-in when the ABS is needed while driving.

You can check the ABS for fault codes and do "output tests" with a scan tool such as VCDS to see if the ABS components are functioning correctly.

Thomas
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Sunday, March 30th, 2014 AT 9:21 AM
Tiny
DABB
  • MEMBER
There is two lines coming out off the Master cylinder connecting to the ABS system. Took the line off the ABS system (FR problem line) no a drop of brake fluid. ( Every other line are good, brake fluid drop dropping when loosen then). Only this one line is dry. Remedy

Domingo.
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Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014 AT 7:38 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I have to admit that sounds like a hydraulic controller problem. Normally the fluid pathway is open to fluid flow until a skid is detected, then the system first blocks additional fluid flow regardless of how much more you press the brake pedal. If the skidding doesn't stop, it bleeds off fluid pressure, then, when the wheel picks up speed again, it applies fluid pressure to reapply that brake. The "block, bleed, apply" sequence takes place about 15 times per second. It would appear the "block" valve is stuck, which I've never run into before.
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Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014 AT 4:40 PM

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