1995 Chevrolet Silverado noise

Tiny
MADLAYLA
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
  • 0.5L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 213,000 MILES
When I put truck in gear I hear a pinging sound comeing from back of truck
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Friday, August 29th, 2014 AT 1:56 PM

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Tiny
MADLAYLA
  • MEMBER
I didn't get any answers
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Friday, August 29th, 2014 AT 2:03 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
What kind of an answer are you hoping for? You know we can't hear it over a computer, so most of us won't bother you with a less-than-useful answer. To do so takes your post "off the list" of questions awaiting an answer, then no one else will see it or get a chance to respond. That does you a disservice, and they know it.

You need to provide some type of clue or observation to help us come up with a course of action. If you get a single metallic "clink" when you shift to "drive", and again if you shift to "reverse", suspect a worn universal joint. Usually you'll see a broken bearing cup or there will be a reddish-brown rust stain around one of them. If you put the transmission in neutral and block the wheels, you can twist the drive shaft and see the movement in the joint.

You could have a worn or broken exhaust system hanger that is letting the tail pipe hit the frame or a suspension part. An exhaust pipe could be rusted apart and the two joined parts are banging against each other.

There's lots of other potential causes of noises. The people at tire and alignment shops are real good at finding them, but you have to be able to tell them under what circumstances it occurs so they are able to replicate that.

There is a tool you might be able to borrow or rent from an auto parts store that borrows them called the "Chassis Ear". It is a set of six microphones, a switch box, and headphones. You clip the microphones to suspect points, then drive around while listening with the headphones. You can move the microphones around to zero in on the source of the noise. Be aware that many mechanics have never seen or even heard of this tool. Suspension and alignment mechanics use it to find rattles, squeaks, and other noises
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Friday, August 29th, 2014 AT 4:43 PM

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