1992 Ford Explorer sas sensor

Tiny
MOSESLO
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 FORD EXPLORER
  • 4.0L
  • V6
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 200,000 MILES
I'm having problems with SAS senor can it be fixed
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, June 8th, 2015 AT 11:18 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
No, you have to buy a new truck.

Okay, ... Seriously, what is an "SAS" sensor and what symptoms are you having? What system is involved?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, June 8th, 2015 AT 11:24 PM
Tiny
MOSESLO
  • MEMBER
It steering angle and yes it can be fixed thanks for not helping
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, June 9th, 2015 AT 9:50 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Of course I didn't help. Look at what you posted, then tell me what kind of answer you expected. You couldn't be bothered to include the symptoms, any observations that might help with a diagnosis, or any relevant clues. It amazes me when people think we're psychic and we know everything about the problem that you know but won't share.

You won't even tell me why this sensor needs to be "fixed", but I can only guess that a mechanic is involved in this. If so, why didn't they elaborate and tell you how the system is repaired? You should know that anything can be fixed. It's just a matter of how to proceed.

We never "fix" sensors either; we replace them. We fix the circuit or system. I have 30 years experience with tv / vcr repair where we DO fix down to the component level. I can do that with engine sensors too because I used to modify them to create learning experiences for my students. No mechanic will do that for a customer though because if the repair doesn't last, they will be angry if they have to come back a second time. People are less likely to be angry over a higher bill than from trying to cut corners and being unsuccessful. The same is true of alternators and starters. I can "fix" them for myself, but I'd never do that for anyone else.

The other problem that I would have wanted to help you avoid, is if you got this information from a diagnostic fault code, which you also didn't share, you will likely make the same mistake most do-it-yourselfers make. That is to assume fault codes tell you which part to replace. In fact, fault codes never say to replace parts or that they're bad. When a part, most often a sensor, is referenced in a fault code, that part is actually the cause of the code only about half of the time. Fault codes only tell you the circuit that needs further diagnosis, or the unacceptable operating condition. I read way too often that someone replace the sensor two or three times, and the fault code is still coming back, then they don't know what to do. If you had bothered to say you have a code related to this sensor, I could have found the wiring diagram and told you what and where to test in that circuit to rule out everything else before condemning the sensor.

Abbreviations like "SAS" add to the confusion when you don't elaborate. That same thing means something entirely different to a different manufacturer. In the future, to have the best chance of getting a reply of value, please include all the clues and information you know, and spell out the words. Thank you for listing the engine size. You wouldn't believe how many people ask engine-related questions and don't say which engine they have. Please use punctuation too, otherwise what some people write can be read two or three different ways that mean very different things. Some people get sarcastic when I ask them to take the time to use punctuation, then they expect me to take much more time to compose a thoughtful and helpful answer.

Also please be aware that my house was destroyed by fire last year. Now I drive 21 miles round-trip, usually every night, to sit in my library parking lot to use their wireless internet so I can help people fix their cars, and the web site owners make that available to you for free. You don't have to be happy that I don't know what you won't include in your post, but at least have the common courtesy to be grateful that I was willing to try.

If testing shows your sensor is defective, it gets replaced, but on most vehicles you have to have the new one programmed into the Body or Active Suspension Computer. You need a scanner to do that which requires visiting a mechanic with a scanner that can do it.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, June 9th, 2015 AT 9:51 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides