Mechanics

MODELS HELP

1997 Plymouth Other

Engine Mechanical problem
1997 Other Plymouth Models 6 cyl Front Wheel Drive Automatic 150000 miles

I recently drove to store, then went in and when I came out 2 minutes later I went to start the car it made a popping sound, like a fuse blew then wouldnt start. It acted like battery was dead so I went and replaced the battery and nothing still. In the process I had hit the remote lock and it made a continuous clicking sound in the car, even though no power what so ever was in the car. I tried jumpin the car even with the new battery and it will crank when hooked up to another car but when cables are not attached to the battery I get nothing, not even a cranking. It acts completely dead.
AD
Avatar
Mason111
March 2, 2010.




Sounds like you have two defective batteries and possibly a dead charging system. What model do you have? What tests have you done so far? Was the replacement battery new or used?

Caradiodoc

Caradiodoc
Mar 3, 2010.
Its a brand new battery from the auto parts store and its a 97 Plymouth Grand Voyager. I checked the fuses and changed the battery, so far thats all that has been done. About a month ago we replaced the fuel pump and did a complete engine flush but other then that the van has been perfect till now, and still it wont start.
AD

Tiny
Mason111
Mar 3, 2010.
Are you prepared to run around with a digital voltmeter or a test light to take some voltage readings? If you are using a test light, just substitute " bright light" for 12.6 volts. : )

If so, start by measuring the voltage on the two battery posts while the headlights are turned on. Since you said it acted like a dead batery, I assume the lights will not be on during this test. You must have around 12.6 volts. Less than, ... Oh, ... 10 - 11 volts points to a run down battery or it has a dead cell.

If you find around 12.6 volts, move one meter probe or the test light to the cable clamp on that battery post. The voltage should be the same. Next move the other probe to the other cable clamp, and the voltage should be the same again. You're only moving each probe half an inch. This will show a loose or dirty cable connection. Next, move the probe from the negaive cable clamp to the sheet metal body of the van. You'll need to find something not covered in paint, such as a bolt, to measure on. Now move the other probe from the positive battery cable to where it connects to the underhood fuse box. Put the probe on the threaded bolt where the cable is attached. If the voltage dropped in either of those two tests, that's the area to check for a loose or corroded connection. It may be hard to compare, but the test light must be the same brightness at all test points. If it gets dimmer at one spot, check there for a bad connection.

I'll wait right here.

Caradiodoc

Caradiodoc
Mar 3, 2010.

AD