Mechanics

CHEVY TOWING A RWD S10

1993 Chevrolet Blazer

Transmission problem
1993 Chevy Blazer 6 cyl Two Wheel Drive Automatic 180000 miles

I have a 1993 Chevy Blazer S10 RWD and am needing to tow it across country using a tow dolly with the front wheels off the ground. It seems I could just put it in neutral but I've heard I may have to disconnect the driveshaft. If so, how hard is this to do and. Well, how would one go about doing that? One more question: If you need to disconnect the driveshaft because the transmission needs to run occasionally to pump fluid, would it be possible to stop ever X many miles and drive the car a bit? Crazy question, I know, but I'm curious.
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Pspeir
September 21, 2008.




I would just pull the driveshaft, risking any trans damage isnt worth it. You will need to go buy a tailshaft plug though as fluid will want to leak out ot the back of the trans. It is only 4 bolts, after you unbolt it, use tape and wrap it around the u-joint several times to prevent the caps from falling off

Tiny
Jack42
Sep 21, 2008.
If you decide to disconnect the driveshaft be aware of one thing -- removing the driveshaft completely without plugging the transmission, where the driveshaft inserts into, will cause a lot of tranny fluid to leak out. Disconnecting the driveshaft from the rear end yoke is easy -- just remove the 4 bolts that hold the u-joint to the rear yoke -- be sure to duct tape the u-joint roller caps so the caps do not fall off. If you do not have a tranny plug -- just leave the driveshaft in the transmission but be sure to securely tie the driveshaft so it will not fall out of the tranny and it will not drag on the ground. Now you can put the transmission in park and not worry about running it.

Tiny
Pear69
Sep 21, 2008.
Thanks to both of you for replying in depth. If I simply disconnect the driveshaft from the rear end yoke no fluid will leak? I don't suppose that will matter, I'll simply check the fluid after reconnecting. I'm no mechanic, but this sounds simple enough. I'm trying right now to find depictions of the drive shaft and u joint so I can know exactly what I'm doing. I'm not finding much. Do you perhaps know of any websites with these depictions? Thanks again.

Tiny
Pspeir
Sep 21, 2008.
Simply disconnecting the driveshaft from the rear is not enough -- you must either securely tie it up without removing it from the transmission--or-- better yet do what 2carpro Jack said -- purchase a transmission tail shaft plug and completely remove the drive shaft. When the driveshaft is removed from the transmission a lot of tranny fluid will come out -- especially with the front tires elevated. You do not need depictions of the driveshaft and rear yoke---just crawl under the rear of the blazer. Look at where the driveshaft connects to the rear end yoke. There are two U shaped brackets (one on each u-joint cap) holding the u-joint to the yoke. You need a 3/8 or 7/16 or 10mm wrench to remove these bolts. You may need to turn the drive shaft to access the 4 bolts so put the emergency brake on and put the tranny in neutral. This will allow you to spin the driveshaft as needed. Caution--be sure to have your blazer hooked up and ready to tow before disconnecting the driveshaft. You cannot move the blazer after the driveshaft is disconnected.

Tiny
Pear69
Sep 21, 2008.
I have one more question: It appears we'll have to tow the car initially between forty and fifty miles before we can disconnect the driveshaft. Will it hurt it to tow it this short distance in neutral?

Tiny
Pspeir
Sep 26, 2008.
I would drive the car that short distance.
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Tiny
Pear69
Sep 26, 2008.
Thanks to everybody for all the advice and we did make it safely on our nearly 800 mile trip. The moment before I was to disconnect the driveshaft our neighbor, who--had I only known!--Is a mechanic came over and said " why are you doing that? It's rear wheel drive, the steering wheel locks--just back it up and tow it backwards!&Quot; And so I did, and so it worked splendidly. Now we know that you can tow a 1993 Chevy Blazer S10 RWD backwards, so long as the steering wheel locks.

Tiny
Pspeir
Oct 7, 2008.

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