Mechanics

SPUTTERING ENGINE

1999 Dodge Ram • 5.9L V8 4WD Automatic • 200 miles

The other day my truck out of the blue seemed like it was running out of gas but I wasn't too low, but I still put gas just to be safe. The next day I noticed my oil was really low so I got an oil change and tune up. I replaced the oil, oil filter, air filter, spark plugs and wires, distributor cap and rotor. The problem has only gotten worse the engine sputters when I'm not giving it gas and will turn off when I'm slowing down. I've gotten two diagnostics on her and the first said injector circuit malfunction on cylinder 4 and 8 as well as cylinder 3 and 4 misfire detected. So I moved cylinder 4 to 2 and 8 to 6 and got another diagnostic and this time it says injector circuit malfunction cylinder 8. Please help any information is greatly appreciated.
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Afropuff54
June 27, 2014.




The chain of events isn't real clear. Did the Check Engine light turn on while you were driving?

There's two common things that will cause stalling when slowing down. If it is due to the idle speed being too low, that is the result of the battery was recently disconnected or run dead. There's a real easy fix for that.

The other thing is a plugged pickup screen inside the gas tank. That will cause stalling when the highest volume of fuel is being pumped, which is during coasting. That rarely shows up right away after starting the engine. Most of the time you can drive for ten to fifteen miles before it acts up, then the engine will restart after a few minutes and do the same thing in less and less time.
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Caradiodoc
Jun 27, 2014.
Yes the check engine light has been on while I'm driving

Tiny
Afropuff54
Jun 27, 2014.
Sometimes itll die out before I even get down the block other times it just sputters the whole way to my destination. But when it does die itll die like 3 or 4 times before I make it to my destination.

Tiny
Afropuff54
Jun 28, 2014.
You haven't said anything new yet. Was the battery recently disconnected? Do you have a fuel pressure gauge? If not, you should be able to borrow one from an auto parts store that borrows or rents tools.

The fuel pressure will vary depending on load on the engine but it needs to be at least around 40 psi for the engine to run right.

If you find it's okay, the next suspect would be the MAP sensor. It has the biggest say in fuel metering. When they start to fail they can send the wrong signal voltage, but as long as that voltage stays within the acceptable range, it won't set a diagnostic fault code.

Caradiodoc
Jun 28, 2014.

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